OTHER WTB ANYONE WITH EXPERIENCE REPAIRING A FLOPPY DRIVE

Discussion in 'Want to Buy Requests (WTB)' started by Nano Babe, Oct 6, 2018.

  1. Nano Babe

    Nano Babe Robust Member

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    WTB, im based in the Uk. I have a pretty standard floppy drive that needs attention, wondered if anyone has experience in repairing these, I have already looked into the simple route of just replacing it with one from eBay or buying an adapter to convert another, or a usb emulator, but have had no luck, I have also seen various YouTube videos on how to go about diagnosing and repairing. So I am looking to pay someone to try and fix it please PM me if this sounds like you IMG_0530.JPG IMG_0527.JPG IMG_0533.JPG IMG_0537.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
  2. FaZyCrUcK

    FaZyCrUcK Spirited Member

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    You know...

    You're 3 and a half times more likely to get a helpful response if you're clearer... is it a standard PC drive, or from an Amiga etc?
     
  3. Nidge

    Nidge Spirited Member

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    Doesn't look like an standard Amiga or a PC FDD, there's no molex power socket?
     
  4. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    It's basically a pc drive with different connector. Much like the IBM ps2 used.
     
  5. Nully

    Nully Enthusiastic Member

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    Sourced from, where do you live, what is wrong with it, what is it supposed to do, is the repair testable without the source device (proprietary) ?
     
  6. TriMesh

    TriMesh Site Supporter 2013-2017

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    It's a standard floppy, but one with a 26 pin interface - it's probably out of something like a sampler.
     
  7. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    It's from a sega mega disk. But with making an adapter lead, you could test it on a pc just fine I'd imagine.
     
  8. Nano Babe

    Nano Babe Robust Member

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    Hey yes, I have looked at Yamaha Roland and other similar keyboards and samplers, they are indeed 26pin but ribbon connection instead of the 26pin. Yes a lot of people have similar problems trying to get replace dying floppy drives for those items, But they do have the option and also space to add usb emulators or converted 34pin floppy drives
     
  9. Nano Babe

    Nano Babe Robust Member

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    it is and yes I think it is a standard pc floppy disk just an obscure one 26pin were phased out in favour of 34pin which are easy to find. Oh and one more thing looks like there was a revised vision ( probably because 34pin drives were more common) of the mega disk with the 34pin drive... :(
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
  10. Nano Babe

    Nano Babe Robust Member

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    No it not an Amiga one, but some external cased Amiga floppy disks are actually 26pin! But not way of knowing which
     
  11. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    Personally, I'd just put in a standard drive and make a new cable that does the adaptation. Rather than trying to fit those large pcb style adapters in.
     
  12. Nano Babe

    Nano Babe Robust Member

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    guess so if someone is confident with a soldering iron, so the only risk is a novice like me wiring it incorrectly so it probably wouldn’t work or doing a worse job and shorting the megadisk pc board
     
  13. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    Don't need a soldering iron. Just an idc tool and a header.
     
  14. Tommygun

    Tommygun Active Member

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  15. Nano Babe

    Nano Babe Robust Member

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  16. Tommygun

    Tommygun Active Member

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    After looking at a couple of different ads for them, and studying their power, I have determined that the white power connector, is a power-output jack, for taking power from the 26-pin and giving it separately to the standard 34-pin floppy, through it's 4-pin white Molex power connector. This is so you don't have to find/make it yourself.
     
  17. Tommygun

    Tommygun Active Member

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    It's a 720KB drive. I asked TEAC company directly.

    The drive is fine, the disks need to be different.
     
  18. abveost

    abveost Robust Member

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    Not sure about that drive in particular but a lot of those old 26 pin things are relatively difficult to repair. Many have a belt that you have to completely disassemble the thing to replace not to mention you have to find/make a belt that fits. Even then it's pointless because you can buy or make an adapter and then use any standard floppy or emulator. Wiring is very easy. Most wires line up directly, with a few being offset by one pin or something and power is on opposite ends of the otherwise unused side of the 26 pin connector. You can use a dozen or whatever female to female jumper wires and a floppy power cable if you're afraid of soldering or having the mess with the wiring.
     

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