Ps2 hdd-osd mod

Discussion in 'Modding and Hacking - Consoles and Electronics' started by Korn16ftl3, Apr 7, 2018.

  1. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    Can anyone explain how the ps2 hdd-osd mod works or kindly point me towards some documentation.

    Another thing I'm wanting to do is a complete manual install of the ps2 hdd-osd mod without writing a premade image to the HDD again if anyone can point me in the right direction or shed some light on the subject I would greatly appreciate it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2018
  2. sp193

    sp193 Site Soldier

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    From your PM:
    Could you please elaborate? What mod?

    The HDD OSD is actually the HDD Browser update, also known as "Browser v2.00". It is installed with the HDD Utility Disc.
    As it is region-locked for only US and Japan consoles, the rest of us need to install a cracked copy. The SUDC3 compilation is a nice project that does this, although you need a modded console for it. These cracked copies do not require a genuine SCE HDD.

    The manual way to install it, is to copy its files into __system and __sysconf, as well as writing the MBR boot program into__mbr (need a custom tool for this).
    FHDB can be a drop-in replacement for the MBR program.

    Are you not able to install the software normally? Imaging is bad IMO, since usually a partial image from somebody else's disk is written, which may break the inter-partition links (hence why you need to use WinHIIP to repair the damage).
     
  3. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    I was under the impression that this method for making an aftermarket HDD show up in the ps2 browser was a mod of somesorts, perhaps that's not the correct way to describe it?
    I actually stumbled across this by tinkering with my offical Sony ps2 hdd and it's utility disc last night. I didn't know that there were axtuactu updates issued for thebps2 honestly only that exploits like fmcb we're built around the ps2 having the ability to update.

    SUDC3? Guess I'll have to Google around for more information about that. My idea behind what I want to do would be a 2tb HDD for example split into 2 partitions 1 that shows up in the ps2 browser like the official ps2 hdd for ps2 data (probably a small partition) and another for use with opl. Another thought is 2 partitions 1 for opl and one for my official ps2 linux. I'm really just looking at options here and trying to understand how this all works I'll spend time with trial and error to see what I can and can not do once I understand a little better.


    Is there a write up on this process someplace? I don't think I've seen one in my Google adventures and I do own a copy of the PS2 HDD utility disc. If I'm understanding above correctly you are stating I can use fmcb to write to the mbr of the HDD correct?


    All of the guides I have found on the ps2 osd on an aftermarket HDD (like I linked above) have to do with writting premade HDD images to an hdd, and I don't like that for 2 reasons 1 I dont understand I don't learn anything from it and 2 like u said it's not really the best idea I'm not certain what the image is if it's good what it contains or if it even has what I want on it even.

    Thanks for your reply by the way
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2018
  4. sp193

    sp193 Site Soldier

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    Not sure if you should be linking that here btw, it's copyrighted.

    Okay, you can say it is a mod because we did have to modify the official HDD Browser to get it to suppport generic ATA disks.

    FMCB and FHDB use the update mechanisms of the PlayStation 2 to run. It was probably an obscure thing because:
    1. The memory card update was only used for the SCPH-10000, SCPH-15000 and SCPH-18000. Or if you installed an updated DVD player, but that doesn't replace the browser. So most people would not have known that.
    2. Only the US and Japan got the HDD Utility Disc. No other region got the HDD unit. Europe seemed to have gotten the HDD for the PS2Linux kit, but not for retail games.
    3. While the update installed to the memory card is labeled as the "System Driver Update", but there is nothing that explained what gets installed onto the HDD.

    There's a thread about it on this forum, by krHACKen.

    You need to throw out the idea of how partitions work on the PC because it's different here.
    On the PC, you can have a handful of partitions on a disk. Within each partition, you could have a lot of programs. On the PS2, you can have a lot of partitions, but each partition is meant for a more application-specific use.
    (Actually, a "partition" consists of a main partition and various sub-partitions, but that's confusing).

    The HDD Browser will list all software installations on the HDD.
    PS2Linux will be installed onto the HDD, in the normal way that PlayStation 2 software will be installed. So you do not need to worry about partitioning, except that your HDD is not a genuine HDD (so you may need some help).

    Homebrew software like OPL are yet another case; since we usually don't have installers that create a partition for each piece homebrew software, it can be copied to anywhere on the HDD. It also means that the software will not be listed from the HDD browser, which only lists partitions and not what's inside.

    There's also one other issue, other than the fact that your HDD is not a genuine one: 2TB is a little way too big for official software. It's huge!
    Officially, PlayStation 2 software that support the HDD only supported 28-bit LBA. So you may not be able to just install your software from the discs, unless you are willing to just use the first 128GB for everything (and you really should not mix such software with software that support 48-bit LBA...).

    I don't know if the PS2Linux folks ever did anything about getting the official Linux port to work with large disks though.

    The Sony HDD Browser will start to struggle once you have roughly more than 100GB of software, give or take (it depends on the number of partitions present). It was just not made for such large disks (the only HDD ever sold was 40GB).

    That is, if you really want/have to do things yourself. There's probably no guide because you would have to do all that with the PS2 itself and the said files are actually scrambled on the disc.

    If you actually install the HDD Browser with the disc (either the official one or SUDC3) and have no need for FHDB, then you do not need to do anything with FHDB.

    If I were you, I would first consider if I really needed to use the 2TB disk. It's something that will only truly work well with late homebrew software.
    Then I would try to find ways to install the HDD Browser and/or PS2Linux, such that the official HDD is not required. SUDC3 allows you to install the HDD Browser without a genuine HDD, but I am not sure if there is such a thing for PS2Linux itself.

    That's possibly because there's no installer that supports installing files to the HDD, from the PC.
    Since that was the only way they could get things done with the PC, it is the only technique that you will find.
     
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  5. MonkeyBoyJoey

    MonkeyBoyJoey 70's Robot Anime GEPPY-X (PS1) Fanatic

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    Please delete the link to Isozone, it violates the rules here. You are not allowed to link piracy websites here.
     
  6. kHn

    kHn Rising Member

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    svotib, sp193 and psydefx like this.
  7. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    Wasn't intended to violate any rules I only posted it as an example of what I keep finding with Google it will be taken care of my bad
     
  8. MonkeyBoyJoey

    MonkeyBoyJoey 70's Robot Anime GEPPY-X (PS1) Fanatic

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    It's alright, just didn't want you to get the boot from Kev. This place is under a microscope so links to piracy sites can harm this site.
     
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  9. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    A lot of game/console hacking sites I read or hangout at seem to be under a microscope I'm surprised this shit just hasn't gone onion on the deep web yet fuck the nosey pricks and censorship
     
  10. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    So I did notice how strange the partition system works on the ps2 because every game for hdloader or opl creates it's own partition furthermore if u use opl on the HDD you need a specific opl partition for it as well. It is indeed very odd.

    Notes on an official ps2 linix install.
    I have been tinkering with it did a full install on an official ps2 hdd after a complete wipe with the HDD utility disc. During the install (keep in mind I just wiped the HDD with the utility) linux still requested a format of the whole HDD before proceeding. Now after installation the HDD no longer shows up in the browser, I only created a 20gb primary partition and a 2gb swap partition. I do not how ever recall if I had the grow to fit option selected or not (I'm going to do a whole nother install and test anyway) with all of this in mind I feel it is worth mentioning that the ps2 hdd no longer shows up in the browser.
    Needed? No not really lol this is really entirely out of curiosity and to see if I can get it to work how I want. No exact purpose more so just convenience for everything being on 1 ps2 console if anything.
    I have also noticed that not even programs like the 48bit patched hdloader do not like to work with a 2tb HDD even after a correct format with uLaunch elf 4.43B 2tb edition. From my searches the best and most reliable large HDD is 1tb and 2tb is still rather untested. I'm not certain why exactly 1tb would partition or format differently than 2tb it's all over the 28 bit limit but on a 2tb HDD my installed games do not show up on hdloader but will on opl.

    Doubtful I'm not even sure how many people use it, as far as I know the whole kit on it's own was short lived and the website for the community is closed down.

    Definitely on the to do list I have a couple new 2tb hdds arriving today so that I can test/tinker and see what kind of results I get just for fun really.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2018
  11. sp193

    sp193 Site Soldier

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    That's because erasing the HDD will erase the HDD browser, which is installed there. Is it not possible to install the browser back onto the HDD without losing PS2Linux?

    So does this also mean that you were able to use the official PS2Linux disc to install PS2Linux on a generic ATA disk? If so, then this means that PS2Linux does not use the ATAD module from games - which require a genuine SCE HDD.

    It's not a problem with the formatting, but these programs that support "48-bit LBA" do not actually support up to 1.44PB of space (as 48-bit LBA is meant for) - especially if it was made before 2016, when I made amendments and tested the various homebrew HDD libraries for support for HDDs that contain more than 1TB of sectors.
    If a signed 32-bit number is used, then an overflow will occur if there are more than 1TB of sectors. 2 ^ 31 * 512 = 1TB.

    Since APA uses 32-bit fields, so the maximum amount of space that it can support will be 2TB. Replacement of APA is required for truly supporting larger disks, but probably not many people will move over to a new format.
    As of now, if you install any disk larger than 2TB, the ATA Driver (ATAD) will limit the number of sectors to 0xFFFFFFFF.
    It's a horrible partition scheme, really. While I wrote earlier that the HDD browser has issues when there are many partitions, it is a problem with the APA driver (due to APA).

    This is actually an earlier beta of wLaunchELF. All new versions of LaunchELF will support such large disks.
     
  12. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    I have not tried to install the browser or anything from the utility disc after the Linux install, good question and something for me to look into as well. From experience back in the day when I had the ffxi box set I at one point formated the ps2 hdd to use on my PC now after I had formated it for PC it no longer showed up in the ps2 browser (of course I had the whole thing partitioned for PC) I had to run the utility tool on the disc to get it to function with the ps2 again. I will run the install software option on the ps2 hdd utility disc and see what happens, other than that and based on past experiences the only other way to make the HDD show back up in the browser would be to use the format and install software option.

    UPDATE:
    just ran the HDD utility disc and the first thing it wants me to do is format the HDD and then install the HDD software. It does not boot to the normal screen where it gives me options to format, repair, install software ect ect.

    I have yet to test this at the moment all my tinkering regarding things with ps2 linux is with the official ps2 hdd, however with what I have observed between my previous reply and this comment u made honestly makese wonder if ps2 Linux formats the HDD like an actual pc HDD, maybe it needs to detect the authenticity of the ps2 hdd before installation? The ps2 linux DVD's does do a series of disc checks (like 2) to see if they are legitimate ps2 discs or not before installation as well. Fun fact only a modchip user can install a burned copy of ps2 Linux due to the fact that once you boot disc 1 and tell it to install it has you insert disc 2 to run it's disc check again then before the installation has you reinsert disc 1 then again insert disc 2 after you enter the installation screen/prompts.

    UPDATE:
    So on the Linux with an aftermarket HDD, I try to boot up disc 1 with a 2tb HDD (sata and all that good stuff) the PlayStation 2 splash screen dosent even load before kicking me back to the browser. I'm going to dig around and see if I can't turn up a smaller sized ide HDD or something some place but so far it seems that the ps2 Linux disc also does a security check on the jdd as well all tho I'm not % sure as of yet. It very well possibly be the 2tb sata factor.

    UPDATE 2:
    Ya it's rejecting the 2tb in size I'm gonna have to look for something smaller, I'm really curious if it will even work with sata at all now (I have the sata pcb from max diy). I sorted all of this our by stumbling across a particular YouTube video here where he actually uses a larger aftermarket ide hdd:

    Not sure I understand the technical terms with what you are saying here.
    I don't speak much (not really any actually) programming language and on a very small level understand extremely technical information. Example: where is that math coming from? Lol

    I'm curious how do the drivers actually work on a ps2? I mean are they loaded into a memory address somehow on the ps2? Where is the PS2 actually loading the drivers from (oem or an fmcb system)?

    I did not know that I did everything from Google and my fmcb that I installed put ule 4.42d on my memory card, it didn't work so smoothly with what I was trying to do. It would read negative HDD space on my aftermarket 2tb HDD and refused to install FHDB for me, a quick Google led me to ule 2tb edition. So I'm not really sure what version is the most current and stable to date.

    As a side note even tho the official ps2 Linux page is no longer operational I found support for it over at psx-scene (http://psx-scene.com/forums/ps2-linux/ ) as well as the original ps2 linux website archived ( https://web.archive.org/web/20100524023205/http://playstation2-linux.com:80/ ) so I'm going to do a bit of reading around and see what's going on there, I also need to get this crap off the sync on green and on to composite ypbr signals for a TV. I tried the commands in the video above but I must not be doing something correctly (cmd line was never my strong suit especially the older stuff be like this).
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
  13. sp193

    sp193 Site Soldier

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    I see. The reason why I asked was because I thought you were already using your 2TB disk. Also because PS2Linux itself did not seem to use ATAD, so it made sense if it worked.

    I always had this impression that it uses APA because w e have the IDs for the Linux partitions recorded in our PS2SDK headers.But it might have just been a homebrew thing after all...

    If it was really formatted with the PC's MBR partitioning scheme, then it should be recognized as a disk with partitions, when connected to a PC.

    How do you know that?

    The PlayStation 2 boot screen is played before the executable on the disc is loaded, so it cannot have anythign to do with Linux at that point. Also, the stock browser doesn't support the HDD unit, so maybe your PlayStation 2 didn't read the disc properly at that point.

    It is difficult to explain why the use of a signed 32-bit number would cause problems with such a disk, without explaining the math. I wasn't sure if you really wanted to know the details, so I didn't go in depth.

    A signed 32-bit number will only have 31 bits for representing the value, while at least the 32nd bit is used to indicate whether the number is a negative value (two's complement).
    The maximum number of sectors that can be represented by such a value is hence 2³¹ sectors. In terms of space, that would be 2³¹ * 512 bytes/sector = 1TB.

    Other than the APA driver, software that calculate the amount of available space on the disk will be affected, unless the developer used an unsigned 32-bit number from the start. But given the semantics of the ioctl2() function, it is very easy to use a signed integer instead.
    Such software would include the browser (LaunchELF included) and any software that installs software (i.e. PlayStation 2 software that support the HDD).

    There is the I/O Processor (IOP), which deals with most I/O. Modules are loaded into its memory.
    Within the boot ROM, there are default kernel modules that provide the same level of functionality between all PlayStation 2 models, which can be replaced with newer versions by the running software. Hence all PlayStation 2 software will have full control over the console after boot.

    Default modules come from ROM. Any replacement and new modules will always come with each piece of software, and will only be used for the software itself.
    For CD/DVD games, the modules are stored on the disc. For other software like the HDD browser, the modules are embedded within the main executable (i.e. stored within RAM, to be transferred to the IOP during runtime).

    It's for this reason that we can redirect requests to the CD/DVD drive to something else, unlike the PlayStation.

    Yeah, since v4.42d was made in 2011, way before any fixes for this issue were made.

    Really? Wow.

    The stable will still be v4.42d because any wLaunchELF version is still beta.

    Composite is the yellow RCA cable. Component is Red, Green and Blue. Sync-On-Green (SoG) is always on, but only affects component, RGB and VGA.

    But shouldn't it work by default? o_O
    If it's not, then that would be very strange, since perhaps most of the world uses component. I've never used PS2 Linux before though.
     
  14. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    I was sure to order the official ps2 hdd for the Linux discs as I was unltl tltltl to l would be a requirement or not. I am however curious if it is dependent on ide insgead. I have no way to test this at this point all my spare sata drives are 2tb and bigger. My primary ps2 HDD is an aftermarket 2tb. Maybe that clears things up a bit?

    Is there any way I can help to confirm or deny this at all?

    Like the video I linked above it shows him installing ps2 linux on an aftermarket ide hdd without fmcb or anything that I can tell do I'm assuming this is possible. I still have to dig around and see if I can't turn up an ide hdd that is not the slny one to test this however.
    This is another thing I'm going to look at with my HDD partition tool because it had to have made it a pic hard drive I can't see any other way this would function like this at all otherwise.

    I don't KNOW persay more so an educated guess, I've tried installing from 2 burned discs before and got no where when it asked to insert disc 2. When you select install at the main screen it prompts for disc 2 then says checking afterwards lauches the installer that then prompts for disc 1 again after a few selections are made in the ibstall process it once again requests disc 2. Disc 1 is labeled runtime environment and is the only disc needed to boot linux after the jndtali has taken place and disc 2 is labeled packaged so ya that's where all the software is. From what I have tried I'm guessing all this disc swapping is disc checks and such to prevent unauthorized packages and other things from being installed??

    By saying the stock browser does not support the HDD I'm assuming that the update was preloaded to the HDD when it shipped then? I got the ps2 and ffxi set back when it launched and it detected in the browser immediately without having to install anything.

    I'm always willing to learn as long as someone is willing to teach and "dumb" it down to my understanding ☺️


    So in theory all ps2 software can be edited to accept a 2tb HDD with the modificationsade to what driver the application loads into memory on start up if I'm following correctly and as an example.

    Ya Google hasn't beeny best friend for this all the information is very scattered and all over the place now days, especially with sksapps no longer existing

    Good to know I will keep 4.42 as my primary then.
    Thanks for the correction I normally confuse these 2 even tho I mentally know what I'm ralltal about :-/
    The ps2 Linux kit shipped with a vga adapter and reaurequ a sync on green monitor. The video I linked also talks about this as he tried using component cables and as a result got a screen with a green tint, he ended up building a sync stripper and converting to standard vga to get a correct display. In order to even get disc 1 to load correctly on a normal tv or non sync on green screen you need to hold R1 (for ntsc R2 for PAL) on start up this over rides that portion. I am still however being prevented from running the startx cmd to run the gui all I get is a blank no signal screen. Ideally I'd like to clean the signal on the component cables and not have to convert to vga.

    If the official ps2 Linux is something that u want to tinker with or have a look at and u have access to a chipped system or a way to boot it pm me I'll be glad to help.
     
  15. sp193

    sp193 Site Soldier

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    All official network adaptors were ATA. So you would have to use an ATA to SATA adaptor to connect a SATA disk to one.
    The console doesn't actually know what sort of disk it is. As long as it is electronically compatible with the interface.

    It is possible that the ATA to SATA adaptor does introduce some incompatibility, but I would not draw a generalization to say it is because of the interface.
    Compatibility with ATA HDDs wasn't even 100% in the first place - for whatever reason.

    If you are really interested in knowing, you can connect the HDD to your PC to see if there are any recognizable partitions. The APA format will appear to standard PC utilities as nothing valid (disk will appear unformattted).

    Did you try again? If the disc could not be booted once, it should work eventually if it worked most of the time.

    The DRM for this console is hardware-based, so swapping the disc normally will always cause the authenticity of the disc to be validated.
    The software probably says "checking disc" as it is checking if the right disc is inserted (to prevent user-errors), as per the Technical Requirements Checklist (TRC). So it is difficult to say that it is an explicit DRM-related check.

    Yeah, the browser was pre-installed onto the HDD, for those FFXI bundles.

    Yeah, which is how some modchips do "ATAD patching", which allows non-Sony disks to be used.

    It's another thing. Some people were perhaps a bit too happy when I made large disks compatible with LaunchELF. Now that seems to be a build that will not be forgotten, although it probably won't be the best.

    There's more to it. The stable is very old and has some limitations. It also has bugs, but most of its functionality were long tried and trusted.
    So you should pick your poison.

    I mean, why can't you just not use VGA then? Does this mean that PS2Linux will use the VGA modes by default?
    If you use a VGA mode on a TV's component inputs, then it probably won't work. The reverse will not work either, unless you have a screen that supports that sort of signal.

    Thanks, but I think I would not want to do anything about this. PS2Linux is another major project on its own, so I would rather leave it to the PS2Linux folks.
     
  16. MonkeyBoyJoey

    MonkeyBoyJoey 70's Robot Anime GEPPY-X (PS1) Fanatic

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    If you use normal component cables with the RGB Sync on Green (RGsB) mode on a YPbPr input, you'll get an image with a pink tint. The sync stripper circuit is what I recommend. The common LM1881n used for this can take the SoG signal and strip then split it into both C-Sync and V-Sync output. Just send C-Sync to the VGA connector's H-Sync pin and V-Sync like normal. Obviously you'll need to split the SoG signal so you get both Green and Sync before the stripper circuit. Don't worry about sending a sync-embedded Green signal to the Green input, the monitor uses it like a normal Green signal in my experience.

    Believe it or not, Sync on Green is more common than most people think. Most Sony displays with RGBHV inputs support it AFAIK. Dell and Samsung also tend to support it in my experience. While I do have an LCD that accepts RGsB, I use either my Extron RGB 201 Rxi to convert it to normal RGBHV for my PC CRT or my arcadeforge Sync Strike with a custom SCART to RCA adapter, RCA Y cable, and normal PS2 component cables. The Sync Strike splits it into C-Sync/V-Sync on my model and then sends it over a VGA cable to the monitor. It should work on something like 99% of monitors iirc.

    RGsB has grown on me recently since sending RGB to my PVM is a lot easier with it. Three wires instead of four or five is so much easier lol! I even use high quality RCA cables and BNC to RCA and VGA connector to RCA adapters.



    TL;DR: Use RGsB with a custom sync stripper if you can or invest in a good quality RGB to YPbPr converter. There are also mods to remove RGsB output on the PS2 and replace it with normal RGBHV and RGBS iirc. Unless there is a way to force a YPbPr mode on the Linux kit?


    (This post doesn't add much to the topic at hand so carry on lol!)
     
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  17. Korn16ftl3

    Korn16ftl3 Robust Member

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    Ya know after some thinking.....rgb = scart (pal even tho I'm ntsc) so I should go ps2 to scart to HDMI and put that chip(LML881N) in the scart converter that should solve the problem, that extra signal in the green is apparently redundant in the first place and not needed from what I inunderstand.

    Initially I was thinking ypbpr to HDMI converter but after some research ypbpr and rgb are apparently different even tho the colors represent red green and blue also.....so damn confusing.

    I do have a ypbpr to HDMI comvconve laying around and I'll give it a shot but like I said it's not the same as rgb (I don't even think it uses the see pins on the ps2 end of the plug) so I'm not really expecting it to work.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2018
  18. sp193

    sp193 Site Soldier

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  19. MonkeyBoyJoey

    MonkeyBoyJoey 70's Robot Anime GEPPY-X (PS1) Fanatic

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    The VGA format is 640x480p@60Hz, not RGBHV or RGsB (SoG). While it is not officially part of the 15kHz standard typically used in SCART, the signal can still be transmitted via a SCART connector on a device that accepts 640x480p@60Hz over its RGB inputs, like a Framemeister or some modern LCDs equipped with SCART. The only issues here are the obvious non-standard SCART RGB signal (not an issue on compatible devices) and RGsB being sent to an input that only accepts RGBS. This can be corrected using a custom sync stripper circuit.

    If his TV accepts the VGA format (not RGBHV which is commonly referred to as VGA even when it is not 31kHz) over the RGBS input, I don’t see why he can’t use SCART with a custom sync stripper circuit to convert RGsB to RGBS. Heck, professional Sony Trinitron CRT monitors like the PVMs and BVMs accept sync on green over their RGB inputs in both 15kHz and 31kHz modes (on compatible monitors) and most of those use 4 BNC connectors for RGBS instead of a single 15 pin DSUB connector for RGBHV like is standard on PC monitors. This means you have to use a sync combiner for these monitors and separate cables for each signal. If Sony did it themselves, why can’t he?

    The physical connector does not matter much as long as it is designed for analog video signals, has enough pins or multiple connectors for RGB plus the sync signals, and accepts the VGA standard of 640x480p@60Hz. I send 15kHz 240p/480i RGsB from my Extron RGB 201 Rxi to my PVM using RCA cables and BNC to RCA plugs after all.

    Also, RGsB to YPbPr converters exist.

    This is analog video we’re talking here after all. As long as it is in the frequency range, it should work iirc. The method of getting it there doesn’t matter too much AFAIK.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2018

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