Looking for 4 testers for SuperCIC/IGR/1chip mod

Discussion in 'Modding and Hacking - Consoles and Electronics' started by Bad_Ad84, Nov 7, 2015.

  1. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    I installed one a few days ago and the auto mode worked perfectly for me and the other testers I have spoken to so far.

    But seeing as v2 with uIGR is incoming, its pointless trying to figure it out on your install.
     
  2. borti4938

    borti4938 Robust Member

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    L+R+Select+B is NOT the auto mode in the IGR implementation by Ikari_01. This is a popular missunderstanding!!!
    https://github.com/borti4938/sd2snes/blob/develop/misc/igr_backups/igr/snes-igr.asm#L64
    L+R+Select+B changes back to the mode set by the SuperCIC. So, if you change with the reset button to the Auto Mode, L+R+Select+B acts like as switching to the auto mode. However, keep in mind that the IGR always starts with the SuperCIC mode (needed for the region timeout) and you are only able to see the mode switch by the reset button if the IGR is in SuperCIC mode.
    As an example: you have set the SuperCIC to NTSC mode and you change to PAL mode using the IGR you have the NTSC mode back if you use L+R+Select+B (SuperCIC mode) or L+R+Select+A (IGR NTSC mode)

    These drawbacks are tackeled (among others) with the uIGR:
    - L+R+Select+B is auto mode (SuperCIC mode is up on L+R+Select+(Left or Right).
    - uIGR switches to the SuperCIC mode if the user changes the mode with the reset button
    - uIGR stores the mode you set either by reset button or controller during power cycles (that's why the region timeout was moved from the SuperCIC to the uIGR)
     
  3. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    The way I understood auto mode is to make it same mode as the inserted cart, which is the mode supercic detects the cart is.

    So set auto mode and its always same as the inserted cart.

    Like I said before though, uIGR incoming when v2 boards arrive
     
  4. borti4938

    borti4938 Robust Member

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    This is the way I uderstand auto mode, too.
    However, with the IGR you cannot directly access the auto mode using the controller! I just wanted to point it out that the 'bug' reported by malcolm is not a 'bug' with high probability ;)
    - If you set the SuperCIC in NTSC (LED red) you will get NTSC (LED red) with L+R+Select+B
    - If you set the SuperCIC in PAL (LED green) you will get PAL (LED green) with L+R+Select+B
    - If you set the SuperCIC in Auto (LED yellow) you will get Auto (LED yellow) with L+R+Select+B

    This is different with the uIGR, where L+R+Select+B is a real auto mode.
     
  5. malcolm

    malcolm Rising Member

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    Thanks for the info, and for clearing up the auto mode with IGR.

    The mod board works perfectly and SuperCIC and IGR functions well as documented.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2015
  6. Bearking

    Bearking Konsolkongen

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    Here is a handful of pictures and a somewhat detailed description of my install in a US SNES. Sorry about the time this has taken me. I've been quite busy, then drunk and then sick :O

    1. Remove the CIC chip. First locate the CIC-chip on your SNES. It's the one marked in the picture below. On different variations of systems this can be placed differently, but on this one it's on the lower right side with the system facing you.
    [​IMG]

    Removing the CIC can be tricky if you haven't tried it before. If you don't have a hot air station the easiest way to do this is to use Chip Quik which is a special (but expensive) kind of solder that will melt at much lower degrees, making it possible to heat up all pins at once and remove the chip easily.
    However, this can still be done using regular solder and a normal soldering iron.
    Start by adding a lot of solder, covering all the pins on one side of the chip. Like such:
    [​IMG]

    Now use a small pointy object and carefully pry it underneath the chip as you heat up the solder. Causing it to lift from the pads. It's very important that you heat up the solder properly when doing this, otherwise you can risk damaging the solder pads underneath!
    [​IMG]

    Here is one side almost completely free. Once that's achieved, it's very easy to remove the chip by simply adding solder and heat to the pins on the opposite side of the chip.
    [​IMG]

    After you have removed the chip, clean off the solder pads properly using isopropyl alcohol and desoldering braid. I forgot to take a picture of this :/

    I have marked where you need to solder wires to the SuperCIC board. Pin 1,2,7,8,10 and 11 are the ones you need to solder to. Do yourself a favor and use thin single core wire, often called kynar wire. It's a lot easier to deal with. Liquid flux can also help achieve better soldering on these small pads.
    [​IMG]

    2. Remove the crystal. It's held in place by two through hole pins, simply desolder it.
    [​IMG]
    Take note of the right hole marked + next to TC1. From here you need to solder a wire to the pad marked "TC+". There's a picture at the end of this post that shows this wire installed.

    3. This is the CPU:
    [​IMG]

    Locate pin 111. I've marked it here for you (but count backwards from 120 to make 100% sure that you got the right one):
    [​IMG]

    This pin needs to be lifted, and it can be quite tricky if you don't know how. Really it's just a matter of heating up the base of the pin and prying it outwards using a very thin and pointy object, but be careful not to use too much force or the pin could easily break off!
    Some people use a needle for this, but in my case I use a pair of very thin pliers. Just use whatever you feel comfortable using.
    Make absolutely sure that you have no shorts with any of the surrounding pins, and make sure that the solder pad it was connected to hasn't shorted with the other pins either.

    This is what it should look like:
    [​IMG]

    Now it's time to solder a wire from the lifted pin to the pad called "CPU" on the SuperCIC board. If you're not 100% comfortable soldering this, it may help to put a piece of tape underneath the pin, to make sure you don't accidentally solder the pins together. But be careful not to tear off the pin when placing down the tape!

    Personally I don't do this anymore, but I did find it very helpful when I started doing these mods. Nevertheless I've demonstrated below:
    [​IMG]

    4. This step can be skipped if you use RGB cables (which you should), but mandatory if you use S-video and Composite. Otherwise you won't get any color when switching to 50 or 60Hz (depending on the region of your console).

    Locate the RGB encoder:
    [​IMG]

    Just like we did with the CPU, lift pin 9 and solder a wire to it. This wire goes to "RGB9" on the SuperCIC board.
    [​IMG]

    5. With all that done, it's about time to find a good spot for the SuperCIC board. I choose this spot on the underside of the board. There's plenty of space inside the SNES case, but trim all the pins on the SuperCIC board as short as possible just to be sure.
    [​IMG]

    Use common sense and put a piece of plastic between the two PCBs. You don't want anything to short out! I used a few drops of hot glue here. It holds it fine, but just be sure not to cover any surface mounted components on the SNES PCB, in case you want to remove this later for some reason.
    [​IMG]

    6. Now to install the LED onto the controller board. This is a bit more annoying on a US SNES compared to EU/JAP models, as you have to desolder most of it to gain access.

    Start by desoldering all the pins highlighted in this picture:
    [​IMG]

    Now solder the middle leg of the LED to the hole connected to ground:
    [​IMG]

    Bend the legs over the board, and keep them long enough that you can solder to them later.
    The plastic piece won't fit now, so you'll have to cut away a part of it. Don't worry, this can't be seen at all once reassembled :) Click all the plastic parts back onto the controller PCB, and resolder the controller pins.
    [​IMG]

    Almost done now. Here's just a few more pictures showing the rest of the installation.
    Below is a picture showing where you can get power and ground for the board easily:
    [​IMG]
    Also note the brown, red and yellow wires that goes from PAD2,3 and 4 on the SuperCIC board, these connect to the controller board through the ribbon cable connector I've soldered to.

    Just to clarify, Red: PAD2 - pin 8, Brown: PAD3 - pin 10, Yellow: PAD4 - pin 6.

    Here is a picture of the top of the board after the installation was complete. You can ignore the capacitors I've installed on the RGB encoder. These help remove the jailbars in the SNES's video output.
    [​IMG]

    And finally the bottom side of the board. Notice where I soldered the TC+ wire, and how I routed the RGB9 wire. I also soldered the two wires to the LED on the controller board.
    [​IMG]

    That about wraps it up! We did it!

    I hope this was a detailed enough guide of the install procedure. Don't hesitate to give constructive feedback :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2015
  7. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    You will be getting more stuff I need testing. good job
     
  8. TriState294

    TriState294 Site supporter 2016

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    I too did my install on my American SNES Mini by removing the CIC with ChipQuik. However upon reading your guide and thinking about it, I think most people would rather just cut the chip off the board with an X-Acto knife and solder the connections elsewhere. I have NOT tried this yet, but I think you can pull the CIC connections for a 1Chip SNES from the following locations:

    <<EDIT - GUIDE PULLED UNTIL FURTHER TESTING IS DONE>>

    These via locations are only for 1CHIP SNES boards (possibly only -03 revision boards). If someone can confirm these locations, that would be great. All I have is a dead board that I've pulled parts from, but the board was good enough to trace out these vias and take pictures.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2015
  9. malcolm

    malcolm Rising Member

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    checked for alternate points on a dead 1chip-02.

    the alternate points mentioned above are the same except cic7 was to s-cpun a pin 122. also didn't get continuity between cart connector 56 and cic7
     
  10. TriState294

    TriState294 Site supporter 2016

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    Good catch. Upon second look, my dead board clearly has some shorts. I've pulled my images until I can look into this further (as to not spread bad information). Thanks!
     
  11. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 The Tick

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    Cart slot is valid way to get most of the cic connections. It should also be the same for all board revisions.

    Regarding bearkings post, I would ignore mentioning the right xtal pin, as it's different between mini and phat 1chip consoles. That's why I switched to using tc+ as its the same for all
     
  12. TriState294

    TriState294 Site supporter 2016

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    All CIC connections are on the cart slot except CIC 8 and CIC 10, correct? Do you have the list of pin pairings handy? I'm having trouble confirming CIC 7 on the cart slot now too.
     
  13. borti4938

    borti4938 Robust Member

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    Some loosely remarks to the testers of the last posts and the testers in general ;)

    - If the CIC is removed, you may also remove C9, too
    - CIC 1, 2 and 11 can be get directly from the cartridge slot pin 55, 24 and 25 (same order)
    - CIC 8 is the reset button (lower right pin on 1Chip big model consoles, upper left on SNES Mini/Jr.; downside of the mainboard, controller port is down, MultiAV up)
    - CIC 10 is reset out and connected to S-APU pin 100; in 1Chip big model consoles, there is a via directly in front of the pin (follow the trace just 1cm)
    - CIC 7 is connected to S-CPUN 122 (if I have it correctly in mind). On the 1Chip big model there exists a place for a cap on the downside of the mainboard named C72 (NTSC console) or C74 (PAL console), where you can get CIC 7 (left solder point with the via next to it)
    - the signal at CIC 7 is the equivalent signal as on cart slot pin 56 (clock for the CIC-key). You may want to use this pin instaed of CIC 7
    - (NTSC 1Chip big model consoles only) S-RGB pin 9 is connected to a jumper called SCLN. Just scratch up the connection there and connect the left pin

    Hope, these remarks help to reduce installation errors :)
     
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  14. keropi

    keropi Familiar Face

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    maybe this will help, made it back then when I installed borti4938's board , you can see the CIC, GND/VCC, xtal and joypad points :

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. malcolm

    malcolm Rising Member

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    thank you! again a great source of information. just tested cic7 to left side c72 on NTSC 1chip-02 and indeed it has continuity to cic7

    20151208_235113.jpg
     
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  16. Bearking

    Bearking Konsolkongen

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    That's a good point. Fixed :)

    I don't think cutting the CIC chip off with an x-acto knife is a good idea. If the knife slips you could end up cutting the traces underneath.
    You're absolutely right that most people would probably prefer soldering the CIC-wires elsewhere. I just personally like soldering them here, because I like my wires as short and neat as possible :)
    Some great information posted by borti and keropi regarding this. Maybe I'll try it out next time :)
     
  17. malcolm

    malcolm Rising Member

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    Following on from borti4938 information. Here is a picture with marked locations for alternate cic points. Might make installs easier.

    removed image corrected in post below
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
  18. borti4938

    borti4938 Robust Member

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    CIC 2 and 11 are in incorrect order. Just change it ;)

    Edit:

    cic alt points-2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
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  19. malcolm

    malcolm Rising Member

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    SNES mini alt cic locations
    Edit: changes made to reflect advice from borti4938

    snesmini altcic.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
  20. borti4938

    borti4938 Robust Member

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    I'm not sure, but if I have it correctly in my mind, the via below 'R8' (1cm or something like that) is CIC 7, too.
    Also I think the upper left pin of the reset button is connected to CIC 8 and not the upper right.
     

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