Let's learn Japanese the modern cutting edge way

Discussion in 'Japan Forum: Living there or planning a visit.' started by ASSEMbler_archived, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. Punch

    Punch A goddamn idiot.

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    You might be right. If that helps you, why not?
     
  2. Punch

    Punch A goddamn idiot.

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    all 4 videos of this channel are gold
     
  3. Tchoin

    Tchoin Site Patron

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    I started learning Japanese in April this year, I've been going to 1½ hour lessons once a week at a language school with a native Japanese teacher. I'm at the point of engaging in some basic conversation, asking for directions, etc., and fluently reading/writing in kana.

    The course terms at this language school are 12 classes (roughly 3 months), and it uses the book 'Japanese for Busy People' I, II, III. First few terms of the course (first year and something) are with 'Japanese for Busy People I' - the first term is dictated in romaji, but after that we switch to using the Kana version of the books.

    As @Punch said, study Kana, from day one if possible, and stay as little as possible with romaji. It's not that hard and the resource shared: japanese-lesson.com is great for this. Take a go at Hiragana first, and then go for Katakana. Download the practice sheets and do it hundreds of times.

    Some good resources that have worked for me:

    Book:
    • Japanese for Busy People I (Kana Version)
    Kana:
    • Practice Sheets: http://japanese-lesson.com/
    • Flashcards (web): http://realkana.com/
    • Flashcards (mobile app): Get Kana (flashcards with suggestions in romaji/phonetics)
    • Flashcards + vocabulary (mobile app): Kana Town (flashcards without suggestions, keeps track of progress, and also lets you practice vocabulary with packs of words using SRS system, really good!!)
    • Reading (web): NHK news web EASY イーシー (news website from NHK written in 'simple' Japanese; short, concise news with furigana - small kana on top of the kanji - and also with audio guide).
    • Translation (web): rikaikun (Chrome/Firefox add-on - translate Japanese words by hovering; good combination with the website above)

    Hope this helps!
     
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  4. 0x7337

    0x7337 Newly Registered

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  5. djmdma02

    djmdma02 Active Member

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    Just to throw in a couple of thoughts...

    Pimsleur works, but you have to keep at it and go back and review. I found that if you start off with the Mischel Thomas method first, it clears up a lot of the things that Pimsleur forgets to tell you. Even though Rosetta Stone is not as great as the commercials make them out to be, I still plan on buying it, as 129 for any benefit is not a bad thing.

    Beyond that, make sure to be taking care of your Hiragana and Katakana at the same time and once mastered, learning your Kanji.

    This being said, 2 years in (I live in America, with no one to speak with...), I still have a long way to go. :)

    One day: http://osnet.mangaindia.in/tomaya-the-old-japanese-inn-that-only-accepts-reservations-by-post/
     
  6. djmdma02

    djmdma02 Active Member

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    An update to my last post, I ended up buying Rosetta Stone (not the subscription) for IOS. Knowing of and using the the other tools, I would be woefully unprepared if I only used Rosetta Stone. Still though, it has been helpful in it's own way.

    I have also been using the Kanji Study app for Androind, and that thing is awesome!

    I have thrown into the mix Duolingo for good measure, and (if you know where the faults are) it has been helpful as well.

    I am looking forward to trying to take my N5's next summer, though I hope I can pass using only self study methods. :)
     
  7. Domspun

    Domspun Spirited Member

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    I've been trying lo learn japanese for almost a decade, mostly with books and Youtube and never progressed beyond very basic level. I started Pimsleur, and my skills skyrocketed within a month. Listening to lessons in traffic while traveling to work, best use of that wasted time.
    Japanesepod101.com is also a great ressource, I use it very often to learn specific things.
     
  8. djmdma02

    djmdma02 Active Member

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    I tried one of the Japanesepod101.com courses, but there was way too much English for my liking. Though I did pick up on some grammer points a few words, it just felt as if much stuck.
     
  9. RolandoBroom

    RolandoBroom Member

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    Kanji is where I always always fall down. And counting systems.

    I would seriously welcome any fun suggestions as to how to learn kanji without trying too hard. It's probably one of the most intimidating things I've ever tried to learn.
     
  10. djmdma02

    djmdma02 Active Member

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  11. ave

    ave JAMMA compatible

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    Learning Kanji is most easily done if you study them alongside the lectures. Good textbooks teach you 15-30 kanji with every lesson, so you learn new verbs/nouns alongside new kanji and new kanji readings in a context that makes sense, and not just randomly. I am not sure which stage of learning you are currently in, but I would say learning kanji is a good idea to start once you are fairly familiar with basic grammar, vocabulary and all kana.

    As for practicing kanji - make your own flashcards (handwritten). The process of creating them alone is going to be really helpful in memorization, so don't skip this step by printing them with a computer. I usually wrote a word in hiragana on one side with translation (in case the hiragana make it ambiguous) so I can look at the flashcard, write my attempt on a practice sheet, and then turn the card around to doublecheck with the kanji. This method has been adopted by most students in my course and those were the ones that scored high at the kanji tests! Hope it works for you too :)
     
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