Jungle Safari for DC

Discussion in 'Unreleased Games Discussion' started by DeckardBR, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. DeckardBR

    DeckardBR Fiery Member

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    Right when the DC was cancelled, a port of the Jungle Safari arcade game was in the works along with an Ambulance game that sega had made. The game never came out but I'm curious if anyone knows how far along it was and if maybe a copy is floating around the internet somewhere.
     
  2. Yakumo

    Yakumo Pillar of the Community *****

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    Both where never in production. It was another one of those urban legends.

    Yakumo
     
  3. diddydonn

    diddydonn Familiar Face

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    I played Jungle safari on a recent holiday to butlins, was a fun game to play, the cab was huge, looking like a jeep from the outside
     
  4. Segafreak_NL

    Segafreak_NL v2.0 New and improved. Site supporter 2012-15

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    I came across Emergency Call Ambulance last December (for the first time since its release). A fun game as well.

    I think Dreamcast magazine mentioned a 'real life simulator' pack including Brave FireFighters as well. (would've been nice with the gun). Not sure if they had it confirmed by SOE but I think they did.
     
  5. Anthaemia.

    Anthaemia. The Original VF3 Fangirlâ„¢

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    The actual name of that proposed compilation was Real Life Career Series, which - according to Official Dreamcast Magazine and (presumably) Sega Europe's original statement - included Jambo! Safari, Emergency Call Ambulance and Brave Firefighters. While a line of code never passed through a Katana development system, plans were definitely made for this package to the point where Sega began promoting such a thing. However, since I've long parted with my ODM collection, I'm not sure who may have been responsible, though AM1 seems the most likely as they were behind the first two games in their original coin-op forms (or at least I think they were - confirmation would be welcome).

    Anyway, there's not much information regarding the exact details behind why this promising set never happened, but I'll guess it was something to do with Brave Firefighters. See, the arcade version ran on the relatively new Hikaru board, an interim high-end upgrade of the NAOMI platform Sega was using before it completed the more permanent NAOMI 2. Because one key feature of this hardware was its ability to process realistic fire effects (in fact, it was created specifically for Brave Firefighters!) there's little doubt one part of this compendium may have been possible.

    During the period Real Life Career Series was announced, AM2 revealed that its own preliminary research had concluded that Virtua Fighter 4 would need too many graphical compromises for a Dreamcast port to be worth producing. Therefore, could similar limitations have brought this idea to a similarly premature end? On the other hand, since the remaining two games were both Model 3 conversions surely we could have been treated to those as standalone items? Then again, wasn't the idea of a budget release due to none of the titles included being too "novelty" and therefore not worthy of separate status? I'd love to know more into the reasons why this one didn't happen...
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2008
  6. Grey Fox

    Grey Fox Rising Member

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    To be honest I think the reason they were touted as a three game pack was because none of them were good enough or had enough of a gameplay hook to be stand-alone games and would have been difficult to round out the packages with mini-games in a similar vein to what had happened with Crazy Taxi. also none of these titles was a huge hit or had a huge presence in Arcades. I played all three at the ATEI show in London and my abiding memory of Brave FireFighters was that it was all a bit dull (basically pointing a hose at a fire is less exciting than playing a Virtua Cop!) - having said that maybe this will get resurrected for Wii.........

    Emergency Ambulance felt like a cut down Crazy Taxi with less freedom, action or fun. It seemed to have an interesting mechanic to do with the patients heart-rate - e.g. too many crashes etc set the pulse racing but again was very much a lesser game when compared to Sega's other big names.

    Likewise Jambo Safari - interesting premise but it never really hooked gamers.

    So the combination of not being huge names in the arcade fraternity (being very much "lessser" Sega games as it were), the stage of life the DC was in and the fact that Arcade ports weren't the draw they once were probably led to the idea of a Triple Pack to offer Value for Money.

    Shame it never happened as more time to get familiar with the games would have been nice but don't think we missed out on too much to be honest.

    I'd have liked to have seen decent conversions of Scud Race (obviously), Motor Raid GP (spruced up with DC graphics) and the Le Mans 24 game as all of these seemed to play well, Lost World even if they lost the licence and called it Dino Shooter or something, Daytona 2, SpikeOut/SlashOut Double Pack etc but then I guess if Sega had been working on these then we wouldn't have got some of the DC classics we got as they can only spread their developers so far.
     
  7. DeckardBR

    DeckardBR Fiery Member

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    Thanks for the great replies. I had forgotten some of the other games to be included in that compilation. Makes me wonder if Planet Harrier was ever planned for DC as well. A shame Sega hasn't released any version of it to home consoles. Emulation of the rom would also take a few years at best from now too.
     
  8. Anthaemia.

    Anthaemia. The Original VF3 Fangirlâ„¢

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    Even though Real Life Career Series failed to materialise on the Dreamcast, did you know a further three arcade games were released under this umbrella name? Due to the original's cancellation I'm not sure they would have formed a second volume, but for the record I seem to remember the included titles being Crazy Taxi, 18 Wheeler: American Pro Trucker and something called Airline Pilots that I've not heard of since - unless it's the precursor to F355 Challenge also using three NAOMI boards, which slipped under my radar... if you can excuse the awful pun! Of course, the other two did make it to various consoles (but only after receiving plenty of bonus content, as with the majority of NAOMI software). Anyway, the reason for Planet Harriers' absence was due to the same reason as that of Brave Firefighters. In other words, much like its NAOMI 2 successor the Hikaru board was simply too powerful for graphically accurate home conversions. Then again, wasn't this one rumoured for the GameCube at one point and does anyone know if this was a so-called "urban myth" as well?
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2008
  9. Yakumo

    Yakumo Pillar of the Community *****

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    Emergency Ambulance was pretty popular in Japan and a very good game. I loved it. however Jumbo Safari was poor. looked crap, and played like an after thought. If games such as 18 Wheeler and Crazy Taxi were made in to Dreamcast games then so could of Emergency Ambulance.

    Yakumo
     
  10. Grey Fox

    Grey Fox Rising Member

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    In fairness Emergency Ambulance was the game I played least and I'm fully prepared to admit that I didn't give it enough of a go to find the intricacies of the game etc - I was just lumping it in with the other two. I think it most likely that these games were either never going to be released (eitherseparately or as a pack) or possibly more likely there was a chance of them being ported but then the Dreamcast situation meant it didn't happen.
     
  11. Barc0de

    Barc0de Mythical Member from Time Immemorial

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    jumbo safari kicked ass!
     
  12. DeckardBR

    DeckardBR Fiery Member

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    I loved Jambo Sarari also. We had a local nickel arcade (2 bucks to enter, all games a nickel) and I would play it everytime I went there. I found it fun to try and catch and wrangle the animals, especially the harder angrier ones. The game was relatively short though. Sega really should come out with an arcade pack of all their Naomi 90s early 2000 era games for the 360 and PS 3 which should have no problem rendering any of them.
     
  13. GigaDrive

    GigaDrive Enthusiastic Member

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    off-topic mini rant:

    Sometimes I wish SEGA had never made Dreamcast at all, but instead...
    Made a 'MODEL 3 Step 3' arcade board & console system (ala NEO-GEO), using a newer PowerPC CPU + Lockheed Martin Real3D GPU + a range of different controllers. Software would be all their older & then-current MODEL 3 games for the home unit, plus they create new titles for both arcade & home, plus some exclusive home games not intended for arcades.
    The MODEL 3 Step 3 unit would be significantly more powerful than MODEL 3 Step 1, Step 1.5, Step 2, Step 2.1 and serve in place of NAOMI, Hikaru, NAOMI 2, etc. It saves lots of development time & money that they'd otherwise spend converting MODEL 2 & MODEL 3 games over to a totally different architecture (Dreamcast), and the saved funds get put into creating new games.
     
  14. Yakumo

    Yakumo Pillar of the Community *****

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    Nice idea but the problem was that Model 3 was very expensive. There's no way they could have brought it to the home at an affordable price.

    Yakumo
     
  15. Barc0de

    Barc0de Mythical Member from Time Immemorial

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    also, MODEL 3 used quads I think.
     
  16. Yakumo

    Yakumo Pillar of the Community *****

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    Ah, like our beloved Saturn :nod:

    Yakumo
     
  17. GigaDrive

    GigaDrive Enthusiastic Member

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    Sure MODEL 3 was very expensive in 1996. but by 1999 (and this is all purely theoretical) it would've been more than *possible* to bring out a greatly-shrunk down, mass-produced, faster MODEL 3-based console into the home. If NEC, Hitachi, IBM, etc manufactured the PowerPC 603e CPU and *a* Lockheed Real3D GPU. The twin Real3D/Pro-1000 GPUs could've been merged into a single 2 pixel pipeline GPU with geometry engine and additional rendering features that weren't part of the 1995/1996 specification.

    Based on what did actually happen with Katana/Dreamcast-- Since Hitachi (SH4) & Videologic (PowerVR2DC) were able to achieve greater than MODEL 3 performance with a few sacrifices to quality, but in other areas, greater feature-set, for a small, small fraction of the cost, I don't think it would've been impossible to do a similar feat with technology directly related to MODEL 3.


    Of course, it was never to be. Lockheed never learned or wanted to learn how to play ball in the consumer 3D market. They demanded high prices for their chips & boards which was faaar out of reach for the consumer market.
    What a pity.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2008
  18. Yakumo

    Yakumo Pillar of the Community *****

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    Nah, that's why Naomi was made. Even in 1999 the model 3 was still expensive compared to Naomi. I guess that's why the Dreamcast followed the Naomi rout rather than Model 3.

    Yakumo
     
  19. Anthaemia.

    Anthaemia. The Original VF3 Fangirlâ„¢

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    Sega didn't go with the PowerVR2 chipset in Dreamcast and NAOMI because of Lockheed's hesitance to produce a consumer version of its Real 3D technology, but more because of a favour Hayao Nakayama made with a golfing buddy - who just so happened to be a high ranking member of a company with connections to the final "Katana" design (as opposed to the US-developed "Dural" alternative)! If there was no way that Real 3D would ever make its way into a console, then how come Sega of America was collaborating with Lockheed Martin on a cartridge based upgrade for the Saturn that gave the platform capabilities worthy of comparison to Model 3 performance? If I remember correctly, this accelerator was codenamed Eclipse and only dropped because management within Sega had already started looking more to its Japanese divisions for guidance... or were they forced? Either way, the balance of power had shifted from the likes of Tom Kalinse and Bernie Stolar to Shoichiro Irimajiri and Isao Okawa by the time Dreamcast was on the way. Despite providing some incredibly powerful arcade solutions, any chance of Lockheed doing the same for Sega's home market was dashed almost overnight.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2008
  20. GigaDrive

    GigaDrive Enthusiastic Member

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    Interesting, I didn't realize there was a personal connection. I knew that Japanese companies tend to favor deals with other Japanese companies, and that's always been one of the believed reasons why Sega went with the NEC-manufactured (Videologic designed) PowerVR2 over 3Dfx, but now its even more personal.

    I shouldn't have said or implied "no way". I should've said Lockheed tended to not be favorable toward the consumer market with pricing of its Real3D chips. Ultimately, Sega & Lockheed Real3D never reached a deal for a consumer game system, be it upgrade for Saturn or a new system.

    Yes, Sega and Lockheed Real3D did apparently work together, to some extent, on a Real3D-based (or Real3D + PowerPC) upgrade for Saturn. Even in the best-case senareo (Real3D/100) It would not have been as powerful as MODEL 3, but the graphic quality would be very much similar to MODEL 3, with fewer polygons, around half. Real3D/100 in any setting (upgrade, console, PC card, workstation, arcade board, whatever) would've been capable of handling scaled down MODEL 3 games and scaled up MODEL 2 games.

    Real3D/100 was more powerful than MODEL 2 which used older, pre-Real3D technology from the same group of engineers/technology base when it was Martin Marietta.
    The MODEL 3 board used two Real3D/Pro-1000s, so there's no way the Saturn upgrade, in any case, would have equaled MODEL 3 performance, even with Real3D/100.

    However, there's also a possibility that Real3D/100 was too expensive, being that it was 3 chips thus basicly a complete graphics subsystem, thus Real3D/100 was more than just another 3D accelerator. It may have been that Sega & partners had actually built the Saturn upgrade around merely a consumer 3D accelerator ( not a complete GPU which Real3D/100 was if you look at its three chips as one) such as 3Dfx Voodoo1, PowerVR PCX1 or Real3D i740. In which case, the performance would've been closer to that of Nintendo 64 or 3DO M2, and not even half way to MODEL 3 which is what Real3D/100 would've provided. A lower-end upgrade with a cheap 3D accelerator would've allowed modified (and not perfect much less upgraded) MODEL 2 games and greatly scaled down MODEL 3 games to be made for Saturn but certainly not as well as a Real3D/100. It is actually more likely that Sega had made the Saturn upgrade with lower-end Real3D tech, or 3Dfx Voodoo or PowerVR PCX1, than a high-end upgrade with Real3D/100, which is what I would've wanted, and for awhile believed was happening based on the 3-page Next-Generation article from Nov 1995.

    Eclipse represents any of the real or rumored Saturn upgrades that were in development (before the more powerful BlackBelt/Dural/Katana/Dreamcast) and Sega looked at any & all 3D chips during 1995-1997, including

    1995-1996:
    Nvidia NV1 (terrible, awful)
    Real3D/100 (very very exellent but sadly probably out of reach)
    1996-1997:
    PixelSquirt (unknown),
    PowerVR PCX1, PCX2 (decent)
    3Dfx Voodoo1 Graphics (decent)
    Real3D i740 (decent)
    3Dfx Banshee (decent)


    Yes, Sega's direction changed/shifted and any chance of a Lockheed Real3D based home game system from Sega was gone by mid-1997 when the PowerVR2-based Katana was approved.
     

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