How to create game art

Discussion in 'Game Design Documents' started by someguy1, May 4, 2014.

  1. someguy1

    someguy1 Site Supporter

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    Does anyone know of how to create some basic game art ?

    How hard would it be to draw something on paper than scan it into the computer and render it to be used in a video game?
    How would one go about making video games that have polygonal graphics much like the PS1, or Saturn ?

    Programs or Software suggestions are helpful.
     
  2. lolzvid

    lolzvid Peppy Member

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    I personally use GameMaker Studio for creating most of my games, and it have a built-in sprite/tile/background editor, but I do not recommend it too much (mostly because there's limited tools, even with the Professional version).

    You can scan too drawings and edit on Photoshop, GIMP, etc (or any image editor that you personally use) for converting it, and the process is not too complicated (maybe because I'm currently working with PCs).

    For polygonal/3D graphics, I really don't know much about editing or creating them (there's Anim8tor and some other basic tools), because most of my creations are 2D stuff.
     
  3. mairsil

    mairsil Officer at Arms

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  4. Jord9622

    Jord9622 Site Supporter 2014 Site Benefactor

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    I would suggest GIMP, Adobe Illustrator/Photoshop, Paint.Net, Corel Painter Essentials, Xara, AutoDesk Sketchbook, ArtRAGE, DrawPlus, OpenDraw, etc.

    Any of those would be great for you. Personally, I would suggest GIMP, Adobe Illustrator/Photoshop, and Paint.Net. GIMP and Paint.Net are free so maybe start with those and see how you do, then upgrade to Adobe if you want. The others are good too, but, I'd start with those.

    Hope that helps. Feel free to PM me with any questions.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2014
  5. TriMesh

    TriMesh Site Supporter 2013-2017

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    It depends very heavily on exactly what you are trying to do - with the machines you mentioned, it was normal for each developer to come up with their own workflow and then to transform the assets to the formats that the console wanted (which was generally unique to that console). For the PS, one of the common packages used for content origination was 3D Studio, but there were also people using things like Lightwave 3D, Softimage or Alias/Wavefront.

    Whatever you used to create the assets, they normally required a fairly large amount of post-processing if you wanted them to work well, and this was often an iterative process because things didn't generally render exactly the same on the computer as they did when you put them on the console, and the differences were sometimes quite drastic.
     
  6. TheRedGuy90

    TheRedGuy90 Newly Registered

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    how does one apply code to sketches
     
  7. someguy1

    someguy1 Site Supporter

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    Trying to get into creating low-poly polygon video game art.

    [ think of graphics like virtua fighter for arcade or saturn ]

    To be available on PC and Mobile Platforms?


    What software or programs, books or videos should to study from ?

    Maybe ask the creators of such older games for the software and programs ?

    Many Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2014
  8. link2rage

    link2rage Active Member

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    I'm interested in it also
     
  9. pato

    pato Resolute Member

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    Well, the workflow would be like this

    1. Draw what you want, if its sides are different, then draw it.

    2. Modelers will made an model based in a blueprint, which is the drawing of the left, right, back, front side (Top and Bottom might be good if you are drawing something like a car) of the object, as they need those to model in the exact proportions

    3. The blueprint can be done in the normal drawing, then scan it, but if there is something out of the proportion and/or the need to digitalize it, then you can use an image editing program like Photoshop to fix proportions and/or digitalize it.

    4. Each side must be an separate image in an extension that a 3D modelling program support it;

    5. The Modeler will put the images in the correct size, and if need it, scale equally to have a better vision.

    6. The Modeler will begin to model it, alternating the cameras for each side, making an exact model of its proportions.

    This is the basic workflow for modelling, not counting the part such as unwrapping the UVs and texturing it.

    For 32-bit like models, since these are very low poly, it will be fast to make, keep in mind that due to this limitation not everything you want can be modeled and also will deal with lack of detail, you will use textures for some details.

    For cars, the common thing is to limit the curved shapes to 2-3 divisions, the windows are either textures of windows or transparent materials, some car games uses alpha channel (texture with no background) in their wheel sides to not look blocky, while the base is the one to have an blocky model, fenders may also use alpha channel too. In some games, there are no interior, in others, they just use cubes with different height and width.

    For people, in most of the cases, each limb is an separated object, mostly cubes, in some games like Resident Evil 3, the limbs are jointed, but small things like hands and head are not, they also keep it separe to make animation easier, as you will need to paint their influences, so you can simply paint all influence in each object, but in jointed cases, you will need to put less influence in folding areas.
     
  10. Shugs81

    Shugs81 Rapidly Rising Member

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    Blender 3D is a super powerful and open source 3d modelling and animation software... also has a game engine built in and is python based and compatible with almost any os... plenty of resources like cgcookie and blenderartists.org to get you going...
     

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