GSCUBE information

Discussion in 'Sony Programming and Development' started by ASSEMbler, Apr 1, 2008.

  1. ASSEMbler

    ASSEMbler Administrator Staff Member

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    This is designed to be a resource for known GSCube information
    protecting people providing confidential infromation.


    Ver.1.0
    --------------

    16 GS Blade working prototype Year:2000
    Location Siggraph.

    Spec (paper)

    - CPU 128Bit Emotion Engine x 16
    - System Clock Frequency 294.912MHz
    - Main Memory Direct RDRAM
    - Memory Size 2GB (128MB x 16)
    - Memory Bus Bandwidth 50.3GB/s (3.1GB/s x 16)
    - Floating Point Performance 97.5GFLOPS (6.1GFLOPS x 16)
    - 3D CG Geometric Transformation 1.04Gpolygons/s (65Mpolygons/s x 16)
    - Graphics Graphics Synthesizer I-32 x 16
    - Clock Frequency 147.456MHz
    - VRAM Size 512MB (embedded 32MB x 16)
    - VRAM Bandwidth 755GB/s (47.2GB/s x 16)
    - Pixel Fill Rate 37.7GB/s (2.36GB/s x 16)
    - Maximum Polygon Drawing Rate 1.2 Gpolygons/s (73.7Mpolygons/s x 16)
    - Display Color Depth 32bit (RGBA: 8 bits each)
    - Z depth 32bit
    - Maximum Resolutions 1080/60p (1920x1080, 60fps, Progressive)
    - Merging Functions Scissoring

    Alpha Test
    Z Sorting
    Alpha Blending

    - Sound: Emotion Engine native audio
    - Maximum Output Channel 16
    - Sampling Frequency 48KHz
    - Output Data Length 16bit
    - Output Data Format AES/EBU Digital Audio Format

    Other Specifications

    Host Interface:
    Peak transfer rate 2.4 GB/s (approx.)
    Parallel bus 1024 bit for data/32 bit for control

    Physical Dimensions:
    424mm x 424mm x 424mm(WxDxH)
    fit in for 19-inch rack
    Weight 106lbs (approx.)
    Power Requirement 100-240V 50/60Hz

    As shown at SIGGRAPH in 2000, it required control
    via an external server (SGI ORIGIN 3400)

    -----------------------
    Planned and actual versions:

    32 GS Blade
    A later spec was prototyped to 64 GS blades.(is known)
    A press release was issued.

    64 GS Blade
    100 GS Blade
    1000 GS Blade

    "The 64-board GScube will put Sony ahead of the graphics system road map it announced a year ago, when it promised to develop a system with 10 times the processing clout of Playstation 2 in 2000, followed by a 100-times version in 2002 and a 1,000x version before the end of the decade."

    -----------------------
    Limitations realized at SIGGRAPH 2000:

    "With the feedback from the demonstration at Siggraph, we realized that
    the present [16-processor] prototype did not have enough performance for
    3-D graphics creation and realistic rendering in real-time," said Ken
    Kutaragi, president of Sony Computer Entertainment.

    "We are planning to introduce a system with about 64 parallel-processing
    units next year." Sony and one of its collaborators, a film production
    company called Square, jointly demonstrated the GScube in Tokyo on
    Tuesday (Sept. 12) by synthesizing a footage in real-time from the
    computer-graphics movie version of Final Fantasy.

    Square is now producing this film, based on a popular computer game, for
    release next summer in the United States. (Not done on GScube)

    "At present it takes five hours to render one frame," said Kazuyuki
    Hashimoto, senior vice president and chief technology officer of Square
    USA. "If GScube can process the graphics data in real-time, that means it will take only 1/30 second per frame."

    The demo with the current prototype, however, reduced rendering for
    textures such as hair to suit the abilities of the system. Where in the movie
    a character's hair was rendered as 40,000 lines, for example, the demo
    displayed only 4,000
    . (This would explain the 1000 GSblade version
    needed to create ANTZ or The FF movie in realtime.)

    "Yoshiko Hara Yoshiko Hara
    EE Times
    (09/13/2000 2:55 PM EDT)

    TOKYO — Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. has accelerated its plans to roll out a high-end graphics computer based on its Playstation game console technology. The company announced plans this week to introduce a system called GScube next year that will use 64 processor boards with Playstation 2 technology.

    The resulting parallel-processing computer will act as a graphics visualization machine with a 3-D processing capability of 4.16 gigapolygons per second and a resolution of 60 frames/second (progressive scan) at 1,080 x 1,980 pixels, the company said.

    The 64-board GScube will put Sony ahead of the graphics system road map it announced a year ago, when it promised to develop a system with 10 times the processing clout of Playstation 2 in 2000, followed by a 100-times version in 2002 and a 1,000x version before the end of the decade.

    Sony demonstrated a 16-processor prototype at the Siggraph 2000 show in New Orleans last July, built in collaboration with more than 20 companies. "With the feedback from the demonstration at Siggraph, we realized that the present [16-processor] prototype did not have enough performance for 3-D graphics creation and realistic rendering in real-time," said Ken Kutaragi, president of Sony Computer Entertainment. "We are planning to introduce a system with about 64 parallel-processing units next year."

    Sony and one of its collaborators, a film production company called Square, jointly demonstrated the GScube in Tokyo on Tuesday (Sept. 12) by synthesizing a footage in real-time from the computer-graphics movie version of Final Fantasy. Square is now producing this film, based on a popular computer game, for release next summer in the United States.

    "At present it takes five hours to render one frame," said Kazuyuki Hashimoto, senior vice president and chief technology officer of Square USA. "If GScube can process the graphics data in real-time, that means it will take only 1/30 second per frame."

    The demo with the current prototype, however, reduced rendering for textures such as hair to suit the abilities of the system. Where in the movie a character's hair was rendered as 40,000 lines, for example, the demo displayed only 4,000.

    "The current prototype needs data tuning," said Hashimoto. "But as the performance of the 64-processor parallel GScube will be four times [that of today's system], it can do more." He said Square was actively investigating the possibility of using GScube in its production work. "


    ----------------------
    The SIGGRAPH DEMO.

    The demo for siggraph 2000 was crafted by criterion software
    for sony rendering a scene from "ANTZ" in realtime. The renderware version
    for GScube was hammered out by some of the best people in the industry
    including Rabin Ezra 1967-2005.

    He helped provide renderware for Sony ‘s GSCube demo on a very tight
    schedule with access to final hardware restricted to on-site in the final
    week. Demo was a real time version of the bar room scene from PDI’s film
    ‘Antz’, (Work to hard deadlines – SIGGRAPH. Complexity mitigation – made
    Renderware automatically exploit parallelism) Rabin was a hardware guru
    capable of grasping the technology.

    Partnerships for SIGGRAPH 2000:

    Software from AVID/SOFTIMAGE and MANEX VISUAL IMAGERY (Matrix)
    was provided, but no information can be found on either site, let alone the
    SCEI site.

    "SIGGRAPH 2000

    MONTREAL--(BUSINESS WIRE)--July 25, 2000

    Demonstration Heralds the Convergence of Linear and Interactive Media

    Softimage Co, a subsidiary of Avid Technology, Inc. (NASDAQ: AVID), today announced that it has joined forces with Manex Visual Effects (MVFX) and Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCEI SCEI - Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated) to demonstrate a joint strategic vision for the convergence of 3-D linear and interactive media at SIGGRAPH 2000.

    SIGGRAPH 2000 attendees will have the opportunity to witness how a movie director or visual effects supervisor will use the latest software and hardware technology to visualize linear content interactively, thus improving the creative workflow and reducing the cost of on-set production. Specifically, the audience will experience an interactive display of a hypothetical shot based on content from "The Matrix" (c) Warner Brothers as developed by Manex Visual Effects and Eon Entertainment visual effects Director John Gaeta Gaeta (gäĕ`tä), town (1991 pop. 22,334), in Latium, central Italy, a seaport on a high promontory in the Tyrrhenian Sea. It was a favorite resort of the ancient Romans and was a prosperous duchy from the 9th to the 12th cent. Gaeta lost its independence to the Normans (mid-12th cent., running on a new hardware prototype developed by SCEI, the GScube(TM), via the SOFTIMAGE(R)|XSI(tm) Viewer.

    The Content

    "Using the SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer, we've designed a one minute interactive shot that demonstrates how a director or cinematographer can experiment, in real-time 3-D, with camera angles, tracking, pacing and set design, all before committing to a final layout," said Kim Libreri, Vice President, Technology at MVFX. "MVFX has always been at the forefront of visualization for feature film production, and the power of the GScube allows us to offer a real-time visualization solution at a level of realism never before possible."

    The demonstration was directed by Academy Award(R) winning visual effects supervisor John Gaeta, of Eon Entertainment, who added, "I've always believed that the boundary between interactive and passive content would blur or even disappear, giving way to a new genre of virtual cinema. The potential of the GScube to redefine simulation, visualization and overall future content is staggering."

    The Hardware

    The demonstration will be running on the GScube real-time content creation system and will initially provide 10 times the performance of the PlayStation 2 computer entertainment system, with future iterations of the technology potentially exceeding this 100 fold. At SIGGRAPH 2000, the prototype will display real-time 3-D graphics at a resolution of 1920 x 1080, with a progressive scan rate The number of times per second an image capture or display device samples its field of vision. See scan line and horizontal scan frequency. See also scan technology. of 60 frames-per-second, which is beyond the interlaced scan rate of the digital HDTV standard.

    "The new GScube development system that we are showing at SIGGRAPH 2000 is the first step toward a new type of entertainment that cannot be realized using current technologies," stated Makoto Hatakenaka, Vice President at SCEI. "We are glad to work with companies that share our vision of the future. There is more than meets the eye in the demonstration produced by Manex Visual Effects and Softimage."

    The Software

    The content developed at MVFX will be running interactively on SCEI's GScube development system via the SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer. For the demonstration, 12 iterations of the SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer are distributed over the GScube graphic processors, each one handling a sub-set of the 3-D data and 3-D character animation, thus enabling the interactive display of the experience at 1920 x 1080, at 60 frames-per-second.

    "At Softimage, we are taking the lead in bridging the gap between linear and interactive media. Our strong user base in both markets allows us to identify clearly the synergy between the different creative workflows, and bring them together when it makes sense," said David Morin, Vice President of Special Projects and Content Group at Softimage. "Our currently available SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer has been developed from the outset with the future needs of the 3-D content creators in mind. Its architecture is both powerful and very flexible, allowing for fast development on new 3-D interactive platforms such as the GScube."

    A number of custom plug-ins have been developed for the purpose of the demonstration, such as a special "bullet time" interactive camera control and custom rendering libraries by AiCube Co. Ltd, a Softimage partner.

    The demonstration of technology will take place in the SCEI booth # 853, Hall F at SIGGRAPH 2000. In-depth demonstrations of SOFTIMAGE|XSI and SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer systems will be held in the Softimage booth # 837.

    Pricing and Availability

    The SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer is an asset validation, previewing and visualization tool for linear 3-D content and 3-D interactive media. The SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer is a free introductory version of the XSI XSI - Express Ship Interface (SAP system)
    XSI - X/Open System Interface
    XSI - Xenos Summer Institute
    XSI - XML Schema Instance ViewerPlus, Softimage's premium 3-D scene viewer. The SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer can be downloaded for free from the Softimage Web site at www.softimage.com. This makes it an ideal tool for viewing simple animated interactive media of all sorts. The ViewerPlus is a licensed product that supports a rich set of .xsi file format data, including IK, envelopes, constraints, user data and custom plug-in data. The XSI ViewerPlus is currently designed for interactive media artists to validate their work as it is passed to the games development team, allowing the accurate previewing of exported runtime data. The .xsi file format, which is a rich extensible file format for 3-D animated media, is the core of the Softimage media art pipeline. The SOFTIMAGE|XSI Viewer is available today for Windows NT, Windows 2000 and Windows 98 platforms, and will be available for the Sony Playstation2 and other games platforms later this year as part of the SOFTIMAGE|XSI version 1.5 release.

    About Sony Computer Entertainment Inc.

    Recognized as the undisputed global leader and company responsible for the progression of consumer-based computer entertainment, Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCEI) manufacturers, distributes and markets the PlayStation game console and PlayStation2 computer entertainment system. SCEI, along with its subsidiary divisions Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc. and Sony Computer Entertainment Europe Ltd., develops, publishes, markets and distributes software, and manages the third party licensing programs for these two platforms in the respective markets worldwide. Headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. is an independent business unit of Sony Corporation.

    About Manex Visual Effects

    Manex Visual Effects (MVFX) pioneered the extraordinary effects artistry that won the company back-to-back Academy Awards in 1999 and 2000 for Polygram's "What Dreams May Come" and Warner Bros. "The Matrix." Manex Visual Effects additionally contributed visual effects to box office successes such as Warner Bros. "Romeo Must Die", NBA Entertainment/Giant Screen Sports "Jordan to the Max", DreamWorks' "American Beauty," Disney's "Mighty Joe Young" and "Armageddon", and the Paramount feature "Mission: Impossible-2." MVFX is a division of Manex Entertainment, Inc.

    About Manex Entertainment, Inc.

    Manex Entertainment, Inc. is a diversified media company with locations at Alameda Point, located in the San Francisco Bay area of Northern California, and Culver City, located in the Los Angeles area of Southern California. With over 150 employees, the operating divisions of Manex Entertainment include Manex Interactive, Manex Studios, Manex Visual Effects and Manex Filmed Entertainment. The divisions of Manex Entertainment come together to create a new kind of production entity, embracing software, hardware, art and design, stage space, digital effects, Internet, communications and consultation/support services.

    About Avid Technology, Inc.

    Avid Technology, Inc., of which Softimage Co. is a subsidiary, is an international, industry-leading provider of digital audio and video tools for information and entertainment applications. Avid's products are used by a variety of customers worldwide including film, television and interactive content producers, TV news broadcasters, corporate communicators and consumers. For more information, visit the Softimage site at www.softimage.com or the Avid site at www.avid.com.

    (c)2000 Avid Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Product specifications are subject to change without notice. All prices are USMSRP for U.S. and Canada only and are subject to change without notice. Contact your local Avid or Softimage office or reseller for prices outside the U.S. and Canada. Avid and Softimage are registered trademarks and XSI is a trademark of Avid Technology, Inc. Academy Award is a trademark and service mark of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. All other trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners."


    ----------------------
    FINAL FANTASY MOVIE MYTH AND WIKIPEDIA INACCURACY

    The GS cube was not used to render the FF movie. However
    Square Hawaii did program software for the unit. As quoted from a resume.
    FF the Movie was rendered on a custom render farm using four SGI Origin 2000 series servers,
    four Onyx2 systems, and 167 Octane workstations.The basic movie was rendered at a home-made
    render farm which consisted of 960 Pentium III-933MHz workstations.

    Resident Evil 3D renders were done by Framestore CFC using
    dual core NT servers.


    "Square USA
    (Honolulu) Aug/97-Mar/02

    * Software Research & Development lead for the production of the movie "Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within".
    * Acted as liaison between R&D and Movie teams, determining software requirements, features, and user interfaces.
    * Developed Maya plugins for simulating hair, deformation tools, and geometric modeling tools.
    * Supervised a group of ten software engineers for a period of four years. Major developments included cloth animation and asset management systems for Final Fantasy movie project.
    * Supervised the design and participated in the development of the “Dancer” hardware-assisted rendering technologies, running on PS2, OpenGL, and DX8.
    * Supervised and participated in creation of Dancer demos running at Siggraph 2000 on Sony GSCube"



    ----------------------
    CANCELLATION:

    Never officially announced. However tidbits exist
    from indirect sources.

    A tidbit from a Sony Employee's resume.

    XXXX is a senior software engineer at Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc.
    US R&D. While he was attending the University of Oregon in 2001, SCE hired
    him to work on the GScube project, but the project ended before John's first day.

    *This would make the lifespan of gscube 1997-2001 or appx. four years.

    ----------------------
    Disputed evolution into PS3

    The SGI Origin hardware + EE cores have been argued as the founding idea behind cell.
    The software and parallel processing developed for GScube has been argued as being the start of PS3.
    (Scalability in Visualization) It is possible to link several PS3 units very similar to the scalability of the Gscube.

    So look no further, you already own a GScube.

    -----------------------
    Hardware locations:

    Japan - Condition unknown. Probably partly archived and scrapped
    to protect technology.

    Hawaii - Rumored to have been flown back to Japan (concept)
    and/or thrown into a compactor and destroyed (other units).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 1, 2008
  2. Parris

    Parris I'm only here to observe...

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    An incredible piece of hardware. Nice compilation of facts on the unit. The most painful line being "Hawaii - Rumored to have been flown back to Japan (concept)
    and/or thrown into a compactor and destroyed (other units)". Hopefully one day the rumor will be debunked - at least once!
     
  3. dickibow

    dickibow Intrepid Member

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    If one turns up on fleabay be prepared to pay!! It wont be cheap I dont think!!!
     
  4. A. Snow

    A. Snow Old School Member

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    When Square Pictures went under were their assets auctioned off or transferred to other divisions? That is about the only way I could see one of these making it out into the wild but considering the tight leash Sony probably kept on them it is a pretty slim chance at best.
     
  5. Barc0de

    Barc0de Mythical Member from Time Immemorial

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    ah, the good ole' GS-cube. I used to ask about that quite alot in my first posts hehe
     
  6. PhreQuencYViii

    PhreQuencYViii Champion of the Forum

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    Interesting, I always thought it was used for that movie. Thanks!
     
  7. sequent_blender

    sequent_blender Peppy Member

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    Some photos of the GS Cube:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Dave.
     
  8. sequent_blender

    sequent_blender Peppy Member

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    Hi All,

    I've gathered a bit more information regarding the GS Cube:
    • How many units were produced?
    Definitely less than 20 and more than 5 in a variety of configurations (some units had "blades" (the GS board of which there were nominally 16) with no audio support, for example).
    • What happened to the units?
    They were initially sent to the US from Japan about six months before the SIGGRAPH conference to allows studios etc to work on them, then flown to Hawaii. Following the conference, they were returned to Tokyo and destroyed. Under the terms of the temporary CARNET with which they were imported to Hawaii, they were not allowed to be sold, and had to be signed off upon their return to Tokyo.
    • Were there any survivors?
    The US operation were allowed to keep one "blade". The remainder had to be returned and were destroyed.
    • Performance?
    The specs detailed in the first post are "pretty accurate".
    • Why was the programme stopped?
    There was no demand for the hardware. The single largest problem encountered was a lack of bandwidth to forward the data to the server for display. It took 10 minutes or more to upload the information to the server. This was never really solved, although some custom cables were produced to link the server and the GS Cube to solve some of the bandwidth problems (these cables were $3000 each!). There's a photo of these below:

    [​IMG]
    • What was it like to programme it?
    Exactly like a PS2 with four times the graphics memory.
    • Is there any documentation existing?
    Yes, but it's confidential and cannot be distributed.
    • Can I buy one?
    No, they were all destroyed.
    • Did the movie studios get to play with them?
    Yes, although they were just forwarded the unit and a dev kit six months prior to SIGGRAPH. They used the existing libraries from the PS2 plus some code to load balance the system.
    • Were any of the lessons learned applied to other Sony products?
    Some of the resource management and parallelization issues formed part of the PS3 SDK (SPU / cell management) but nothing significant.
    • What did a GS Cube cost?
    Estimated at between $50K and $80K from one source, although this may have been a target cost for the final product once significant cost reductions had been realised. The indications are that the actual cost of the prototypes was significantly greater than this.

    That's it. More photos of the blades and the back of the unit in the next post.

    Dave.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2008
  9. sequent_blender

    sequent_blender Peppy Member

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    Photo of the front of a render "blade"

    [​IMG]

    Photo of the rear of a render "blade"

    [​IMG]

    Photo of the top of the GS Cube

    [​IMG]

    Photo of test screen that had to be programmed to test the screen (the GS Cube output at 1080p, and screens of this resolution were not common at the time).

    [​IMG]

    That's all the information I have. Hope this is of interest to people.

    Dave.
     
  10. Parris

    Parris I'm only here to observe...

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    I suspect I know the source, I am amazed (if this is the case) that this person was so forth-coming, yet I also would imagine he/she requested to remain anon. Well done Dave, you put a lot of effort into this and it's an amazing, yet ultimately sad end to the GSCube saga.

    As for the estimated hardware cost, I am surprised as the PS2 Performance Analyser was originally $60k and it had a fraction of the technology implimented in it. Perhaps the estimations are on the low side.
     
  11. sequent_blender

    sequent_blender Peppy Member

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    There were a number of sources used to compile the above, and I appreciate all of the time and information they've given me (they are familiar with this site, as an aside...)

    The hardware cost was an estimate from one of the sources, although it never progressed to such a stage that a firm price could be set, I think.

    Dave.
     
  12. Barc0de

    Barc0de Mythical Member from Time Immemorial

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    The performance analyzer was a development tool (and an exceptional tool that is, with lots of statistical number crunching etc) and carried within it the price of use. ie it was an inflated price. The GS Cube however had more "Stuff" inside it, but it was a multiplication of some relatively low cost components.
     
  13. Parris

    Parris I'm only here to observe...

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    Sheer conjecture my good friend ;-) When have you ever know Sony to have a 'reasonable' price policy on anything? 16 x PS2 Tool blades (effectively) as opposed to 1 is hardly a 'low cost' processor set-up lol
     
  14. sequent_blender

    sequent_blender Peppy Member

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    Actually, I have been informed by someone that the $50 to $80K estimate is someway short of the actual cost, and that it actually cost significantly more.
     
  15. PhreQuencYViii

    PhreQuencYViii Champion of the Forum

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    Especially since it has those killer lights. Those have to add a lot to the tag.
     
  16. dickibow

    dickibow Intrepid Member

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    Yeah and all those little PS2 fans on top must cost a fair bit........
     
  17. lherre

    lherre Enthusiastic Member

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    Incredible !!! I don't know nothing about this incredible piece of hardware.
     
  18. unclejun

    unclejun Site Supporter 2011-2014

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    Found on the ECTS 2000 Presskit.
     
  19. cahaz

    cahaz Guardian of the Forum

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    That some sexy piece of shit
     
  20. dickibow

    dickibow Intrepid Member

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    Sure is :nod:
     

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