Cleaning PS1 discs

Discussion in 'Repair, Restoration, Conservation and Preservation' started by Endorphines, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. Endorphines

    Endorphines SEGA nut

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    I've done a little research online and I see you can order brasso and a few other products from Amazon to help buff out most scratches on the discs.

    I have bought a car polishing and a buffing pad for my drill and I am wondering if there is something locally from a retailer I can buy to help buff out the scratches.

    I was later told that brasso was not a good idea and to make a post here.

    I don't have a disk doctor or a place here that does resurfacing as I am in a rural area.

    Any tips or help for a DIY as I have a few dozen discs I have collected over time that need help from skipping and such.

    Thank you for your time.
    -Endorphines
     
  2. Hypresonance

    Hypresonance Active Member

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    I've read many articles suggesting Meguitar's Plastx, when it comes to polishing discs. The directions even mention usage for CD wiping and partical restoration.
    I do not recommend toothpaste. Brasso doesn't work because (with intended use for copper, brass, and bronze), it essentially breaks down metal, removing the top layer to wipe away corrosion. It melts plastics/acrylics.
    Interesting tip: if you want to remove corrosion on copper, citric acid is the best method. Time length determines the results (in this case, under 4 minutes is best). You can use vinger, but if the item is brass, the surface will turn reddish (zinc escaping). Just remember to neutralize after applying the acid with baking soda or pH base.
    If the above suggest causes you to want to try on the backing of game contacts, I am not recommending this action.
    In cleaning game contacts, use 99% rubbing alcohol and a cloth/material which will not disposite fibers or loose materials. Let dry (will not be too long) before testing cartridge.
     
  3. MaxWar

    MaxWar <B>Site Supporter 2013</B>

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    My experience with home polishing discs is that it is usually not recommended, it puts uneven wear on the disk and makes it less likely to survive a long life. The only thing I recommend is using spectacle cleaning cloth, as it can clean and give a bit of a shine to discs without scratching.
    If we are talking about a 2$ game, I guess you can try some stuff, but otherwise I would recommend you find a place with a high quality ressurfacing machine. You can probably ship the disc and have it shipped back to you fixed. If you have more than one disc obviously you save with this method. I usually wait until I have 10 discs to ressurface then I bring them to a shop where they have 3000$ ressurfacing machines that make the disc look like new. I only ressurface badly scratched discs. If they are still playable with minor scratches I leave them be.

    Edit : Avoid cheap resurfacing machines, they ruin discs.
     
  4. Endorphines

    Endorphines SEGA nut

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    My problem is I have no where that does it within an hour or two drive and I have about 30 psx and ps2 discs that need resurfacing by now and quite a few are actually really uncommon.
     
  5. MaxWar

    MaxWar <B>Site Supporter 2013</B>

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    You should ship your discs to a reputable resurfacing service provider, if you have 30+ discs and some rare ones believe me it is the best solution, there should be plenty of shops offering the service in the USA and your postal service is cheap.
    The one I go to, for 30 discs, would charge me about 1.50$ per disc + shipping. Dont pay more than 2$ per disc for this amount someone should give you enough of a package deal. Once again mage sure they are using a professional machines. I am sure hundreds of shoddy places would gladly take your money and then ruin them in a 100$ machines. Ask what machine they are using and do your research.
     
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  6. retro

    retro Resigned from mod duty 15 March 2018

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    I've said this time and time again. DO NOT do this. You can polish them with a professional CD polisher. Take it to your local game / DVD rental store and they should have one. If you have to travel, or send them via mail, it's worth it.... especially if you have that many games and some are rare. Don't mess up your rare games!

    All home polishers or DIY solutions are rubbish and will most likely damage your precious discs.
     
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  7. JDMACDC2008

    JDMACDC2008 Member

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    I've previously used magic erasers to clean up discs. It does work reasonably well, but can't compare to the results of using a professional machine as mentioned above. If you've nothing to lose, and they're not rare games, it might be worth a shot as it's much cheaper. I fully agree with everyone here though; if possible, have them polished properly - especially if they are rare! :)
     

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