Best Settings on CRT Television for Gaming ?

Discussion in 'General Gaming' started by someguy1, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. someguy1

    someguy1 Site Supporter

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    I'm using an old Sony Trinitron CRT TV with SVIDEO with a PS1. Today noticed that there were more settings on the TV's menu for modes, sharpness levels, vividity. Just wondering if anyone else has attempted to perfect/optimize these settings on their own CRT TV's and what the ultimate settings would be for playing retro games and bringing out the best picture in 8bit, 16bit and 2D - 3D games.

    PS- would you consider using a Scanline Generator ?
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2015
  2. citrus3000psi

    citrus3000psi Housekeeping, you want towel?

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    Settings are going to be based on per tv. There isn't going to be a one size fits all solution.
     
  3. MottZilla

    MottZilla Champion of the Forum

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    Not just that, but different consoles may need different adjustments to these settings to get the best result. Just adjust the settings to your preference.
     
  4. Ultron

    Ultron Spirited Member

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    I would get a calibration DVD or blu-Ray like Disney's Wow. You can pick it up on amazon, prob around $20. I think you could also download one for free somewhere. Calibrate it using a DVD player using the S-video input. Should be good enough for your games too. I would also run auto convergence on the CRT if it has that option in the menu. This will align the RGB guns properly. Should be run every once in a while.

    Disneys Wow is $9 on DVD on amazon. It's very easy to use. - http://www.amazon.com/Disney-WOW-Wo...8&qid=1427769794&sr=8-1&keywords=Disney's+wow
     
  5. la-li-lu-le-lo

    la-li-lu-le-lo ラリルレロ

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    You don't need a scanline generator for a CRT, because it already has scanlines. Scanline generators are meant to simulate the look of a CRT.
     
  6. Rogue

    Rogue Intrepid Member

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    It's usually a matter of preference. A calibration should be good for your own reference, but I don't think a CRT display would ever need that.

    The only time I've really needed a calibration was in a LCD(LED) display that was blending the explorer bars in Windows XP with the Zune theme. I've tried a lot of calibrations and the goal was exactly make the crap LCD looks like a CRT.
    And there are so many people that just don't know/don't notice the absurd colors of a uncalibrated display... So many "professionals" with the main color reference being their notebook lcd displays...
     
  7. ploder

    ploder Rapidly Rising Member

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    I'm interested in this myself. If you have any of the consoles here: junkerhq.net/xrgb/index.php/240p_test_suite you can use 240p test suite homebrew to help with your configuration. Just make sure you read about the tests before hand because there is no on screen explanation for what you are looking for when using the software. The only things I tweaked on my Panasonic TX-28MD3 were the brightness, contrast and sharpness. A lot of people recommend that sharpness should be between zero and half way. This this because on some sets sharpness seems to artificially 'enhance' the image to the extent of introducing artifacts (things that shouldn't be there). On my set sharpness doesn't seem to do much to improve or worsen the image, but that may be different to other TVs.

    I hear the trinitron was a great TV for games, definitely up there with certain Sony Wega sets which were the best consumer available displays. Other than a wega I researched that professional crt monitors (used in TV broadcasting or hospitals) are best and have become more affordable second hand. None of this means anything however if the set is degraded due to age. That's where the 240p test suite can be used to diagnose problems. I found out that on my panny set I have overscan on Y (the whole picture is shifted a cm or so vertically when displaying PAL60). This really helps when playing out of region games so I can Y fix.

    If there's one overall lesson to learn about CRT config (apart from using good quality analog cables) it is to turn off anything that is considered to be an 'enhancement' of picture display. It may be good for films, but will tend to worsen games.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2015
  8. blueshogun96

    blueshogun96 Robust Member

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    I have that same TV, and use it for gaming also. I never needed to adjust anything for it. The picture was crystal clear and smooth, and IMO looks better than most LCDs anyway.

    It's the perfect TV for playing BulletSoul on 360.

    Shogun.
     
  9. Doomtrain

    Doomtrain Active Member

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    Oh man I didn't know configuring CRTs was such a big thing. I've had an old magnavox CRT for years(I use it for anything 6th gen and below) and I don't think I've touched the settings in like 7 years lol.
     
  10. retro

    retro Resigned from mod duty 15 March 2018

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    Trinitron is the CRT itself (the tube), not the television. And WEGA actually IS a Trinitron screen - FD Trinitron is its other name. It is just the flat screen model. You'd sometimes see Trinitron CRTs in other manufacturers' sets.

    Adjustment is less vital than flat screen televisions, as there are usually fewer controls. However, the principal is usually the same - adjust contrast, brightness and sharpness (if available) to suit. You can use a test card, or even a CRT tester or colorimeter, if you feel particularly pedantic.
     
  11. ploder

    ploder Rapidly Rising Member

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    Yeah, it's a good telly. I only had to adjust really because I used to mess with the settings a long time ago while playing dark games like Silent Hill lol. Very easy to adjust settings on this non-flatscreen CRT. Can you hear a high pitch whine on yours?

    You're right retro. I used to know all of this stuff years ago but somewhere down the line my brain's muddled it up slightly haha. I'm curious whether a wega would be better for games than my Panasonic? Perhaps someone who has both can tell us? I sometimes see people on freecycle getting rid of old tvs so if someone with hulk strength can help me carry it home I will have the two sets side by side and can report back here.
     
  12. retro

    retro Resigned from mod duty 15 March 2018

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    Only if you prefer flat screen. Some WEGA televisions were pretty poor and didn't last long. You're more likely to get things like 1080i and 100Hz from a WEGA as it's newer technology, plus widescreen. Personally, I'd prefer a decent 4:3 broadcast monitor, especially if we're talking in the US. Sony televisions won't have RGB.
     
  13. dc16

    dc16 Dauntless Member

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    I have a Trinitron and have never experienced any of those vertical scanlines on my SNESes. Why is that persistent rumor.
     

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