Xbox 360 graphics sometimes become fuzzy?

Discussion in 'Xbox 360 Development' started by H360, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    Hi. When I sometimes boot my 360 up, the graphics I notice have a blur effect or a fuzzing effect.
    After a few minutes, it goes away at random, and then comes back again at random.

    I get pissed off with it because it gives me a headache, and I rip out the power cord.
    When I plug it back in and reboot the 360, it works perfectly fine.


    Any ideas what this is?
    It has never red ringed, overheated or been opened.
    It is a 2008 model (falcon iirc)

    I think the HANA chip needs a good clean reball. Something must be lifting or not making a good contact.
    I say this, because after the system heats up and I unplug > re-plug the console, it works fine afterwards.
    It can not be a grounding issue with the component cables, because there are 3 of them, plus the additional 2 for audio.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2012
  2. hacker360

    hacker360 Spirited Member

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    you need to do the x clamp fix, then take 2 q tips stick em in the fans turn the system on, wait for 2 rrod then let cool. then fixed :D
     
  3. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    You're an idiot.
     
  4. sneakypeanut

    sneakypeanut Pika CHUUUUUU!!!

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    ^^ no your a idiot... that does work but is not advised, personaly i would clean it all off heatgun the board for about 2mins put decent thermal on it, stick it back together with the normal xclamps then leave it to overheat let it cool down and hey presto fixed.
     
  5. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    Uhm. No.
     
  6. sneakypeanut

    sneakypeanut Pika CHUUUUUU!!!

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    gpu or hana is fucked reflow will fix it :p
     
  7. C-Kronos

    C-Kronos Intrepid Member

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    Depends on my hobbies and occupation.
    You could at least recommend that he does a proper reflow >.>
     
  8. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    Guys, I said: "I think the HANA chip needs a good clean reball"

    A reflow is not the correct way to fix the 360. It will just keep on breaking if you do this, and you run the risk of warping the board, burning out other components and even making other solder balls crack if you do not put it in a clamp / frame.
    Sure, it will work for maybe a week, maybe a month or even a year. The point is though, it is not the correct way to do it. So please stop suggesting it.



    This is electronics. Not a cooking class.
    There is only one correct solution to fix the problem.
    You can't just add more flower into the mix.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  9. Twis7eD

    Twis7eD Member

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    Send it to someone with professional experience to reball it then. Your only other options would be to send it to Microsoft or buy a new system.
     
  10. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    I can reball it myself. I have all the stuff I need.

    I just wanted to know, what was causing it.
    I mean, was is it the HANA chip on pad 86, or is is just a bad capacitor causing a voltage instability.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  11. ddxcb

    ddxcb <B>Site Supporter 2013</B><BR><B>Site Supporter 20

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    I think its the EDRAM in the GPU DYE, A possible GPU swap with a Reball could fix it?
     
  12. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    It could be. Only time will tell if it progressively becomes worse.
    [​IMG]
     
  13. APE

    APE Master Baiter

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    Where did you get the money to afford the proper equipment? Buying stencils and lead balls is a good start but it takes a bit more than that to reball hardware. Hell, I don't even own the necessary setup and I'd stand to benefit quite greatly.

    And "flour" is used in cooking, not "flower".
     
  14. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    I got the stencils, lead balls and the grid that holds the IC and stencils in place. I then just use my heatgun.

    How right you are. What a mistake xD
     
  15. APE

    APE Master Baiter

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    Not too sure I'd want to trust a heatgun to remove anything using a BGA or to place it back on but to each their own.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  16. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    It works fine. I just heat tape off everything else.
    Why waste $1000 + on a reflow machine when a heat gun (or even a $50 hot air station) does the same thing...
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  17. halo3

    halo3 Robust Member

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    Industrial heatguns are meant for removing paint not trying to reflow/reball a complex and fragile piece of computer hardware. A heatgun should never go anywhere near a computer to begin with, there is little to no control over the temperature so you run the high risk of damaging the chip or the motherboard. Now the proper way to fix this is with a rework station which is actually designed for reflowing/reballing which will fix your issue. From what your are describing it sounds like the gpu's solderballs are cracked not making a proper connection and need to be reflowed/reballed. In most cases like this, it is the gpu that has the problem and not the hana chip. Fix the gpu first as if done properly it won't hurt it then if it doesn't work try to reflow/reball the hana.
     
  18. sneakypeanut

    sneakypeanut Pika CHUUUUUU!!!

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    ^^ my father has worked in electronics for 40 years, and he uses normal heatguns + rework stations. your not a complete retard a normal heatgun is fine... personaly i have used both and have never destroyed a board using a either. aslong as you keep it far away from the board and dont be a muppet and blast everything from 3cm away till the solder boil and your delaminate the chips
     
  19. H360

    H360 Familiar Face

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    Yeah, you're both right to some extent. A heatgun should not be used, but then again, I take the precautions.
    I mount the board in a frame and bolt it down. This prevents the warping of the PCB.
    I also have everything heat tapped off (or covered in foil).
    My heat gun, also does have a temperature controller, and I have set it to the correct temperature that the rework stations set.
     
  20. Eviltaco64

    Eviltaco64 <B>Site Supporter 2013</B><BR><B>Site Supporter 20

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    My first 360 actually had an issue with the HANA chip. It was actually the first hardware problem I ever had with the 360. I got a black screen with working audio in SD and HD modes, and Microsoft only covered RRoD-related issues back then (they wanted $120 + shipping to repair it).

    I ended up fixing it by wrapping a few copper pennies in electrical tape, putting them on top of the chip, and pushing it down and in place with the fan vent molding. I suppose the major downside to that fix is that it's a hindrance to proper ventilation in comparison to it not being there, but it worked for my Xenon 5 years ago, so it should work for you.
     

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