PAL Gamecube c-sync

Discussion in 'Modding and Hacking - Consoles and Electronics' started by gorgyrip, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. gorgyrip

    gorgyrip Peppy Member

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    Is it possible to mod a pal gamecube to output c-sync?
     
  2. Shinebi

    Shinebi Intrepid Member

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  3. Xeveniah

    Xeveniah <B>Site Supporter 2013</B><BR><B>Site Supporter 20

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    hmm a file backup/synchroniser is what the url points to
     
  4. gorgyrip

    gorgyrip Peppy Member

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    No. I was reffering to composite sync.
     
  5. Shinebi

    Shinebi Intrepid Member

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    Exactly. But why? There's a component cable already and you already have RGB.
     
  6. gorgyrip

    gorgyrip Peppy Member

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    PAL games do not support component. I'm using RGB, but my led tv has a problem when using composite video as sync. That's why i need c-sync. I know that ntsc gamecube has c-sync and s-video, but was removed on PAL. Maybe they were left unconnected..
     
  7. Lum

    Lum Site Soldier

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    NTSC Gamecube having c-sync or not won't help. It lacks RGB to do much with it.

    The component cable and progressive scan are supported by PAL hardware. What happened is most game developers intentionally, for no known reason, removed 480p from their PAL games in software. PAL games will remain interlaced even on an NTSC Gamecube.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  8. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 Keyboard Error: Press F1 to Continue

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    Of course NTSC cubes having it can help... you can see which chip C-SYNC is coming from, by tracing from the AV connector and see if the same exists on the PAL console...

    If it does, he can just cut Composite video at the AV connector and rewire C-Sync to it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  9. Calpis

    Calpis Champion of the Forum

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    You need to mod a component cable for it... CSYNC is available on the DAC, but it's probably a logic level signal and you should attenuate it to the correct TV level. The best way would be to make a 75 ohm attenuator. Put 853 ohms in series (820 + 33), then have a 82 ohm shunt to ground. Tap the CSYNC output above the shunt.
     
  10. Lum

    Lum Site Soldier

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    Yup someday we won't have to use any DAC. That port outputs digital true to its name. Except just the audio portion is understood enough for an optical mod.
     
  11. Calpis

    Calpis Champion of the Forum

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    ? You will always need some sort of "DAC" to decode the data, be it discrete logic to grab CSYNC, a CPLD to latch color components or a FPGA to upscale video and push it out a HDMI transceiver. The protocol is very simple, it's been fully understood for the better part of a decade. Setbacks to such projects include connector availability (both for the device itself and consoles with Digital out) and of course the low profitability. If you're going to sacrifice component cables for the connector you might as well use their DAC.
     
  12. Lum

    Lum Site Soldier

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    Well perhaps, if off topic to say much more. Though following HDMI standards you wouldn't in the strictest definition be converting to analog. Gamecube already provides a full digital signal path, supports YCbCr color, and 480p, three factors in common with HDMI.
     
  13. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 Keyboard Error: Press F1 to Continue

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    Csync is available from the av connector on a NTSC cube, don't need a component cable. Same might be possible on a pal cube, just left unconnected.
     
  14. gorgyrip

    gorgyrip Peppy Member

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    Yes, but pin on the DAC? I don't have an ntsc gamecube to trace it...
     
  15. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 Keyboard Error: Press F1 to Continue

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    Calpis was talking about the DAC in the component cable. Which isnt of much use to you. You need someone with a NTSC to trace it and then see if its available in a PAL cube.

    I dont have any NTSC cubes either, so I cant help :(
     
  16. Lum

    Lum Site Soldier

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    you won't have trouble finding one. that's for certain!
    ntsc gamecubes are ultra common, worth under $5 US. in full working condition any without cables. :(
     
  17. Jamtex

    Jamtex Adult Orientated Mahjong Connoisseur

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    Most TVs will accept Composite Video in place of Composite Sync for RGB as it is part of the Peritel standard. The PAL Gamecube removes Composite Sync with 12V as you need 12V to switch the TV into RGB mode (it should be connected to Pin 8 then through a 100ohm resister to pin 16). Do make sure you are using a Gamecube or a US SNES scart lead instead of a PAL SNES scart lead as the latter will not work and may give you issues. If it has caps inside the SCART plug then it is a GC one, if it lacks it then it is not.

    The easiest way would be to use a LM1881 IC which will seperate Composite Sync from Composite Video, the chip costs under a fiver with postage and just requires two 0.1uf caps and a 680K resistor to do the job. Make it in a Female to Male scart lead then you can just it with every console that may output Composite Video instead of Composite Sync. You can get the diagram from the LM1881 datasheet...

    http://www.ti.com/general/docs/lit/getliterature.tsp?genericPartNumber=lm1881&fileType=pdf
     
  18. Bad_Ad84

    Bad_Ad84 Keyboard Error: Press F1 to Continue

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    This was already known in the thread. He has the same issue as I have with my TV and a N64 that is RGB modded. Composite video on sync gives a really shitty picture. Ran through a LM1881 doesnt help. CSYNC works perfectly.
     
  19. gorgyrip

    gorgyrip Peppy Member

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    Exactly the same problem. The bad part is that I don't know anyone in my country that has a ntsc gamecube.
     
  20. Lum

    Lum Site Soldier

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    It's ok, I can relate. Try to get a pal megadrive in my country.
     

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